Halswell subdivision could create 250 sections

LOIS CAIRNS
Last updated 05:00 21/12/2012

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More than 250 new sections could be opened up in Halswell if planning permission is granted to subdivide a large tract of rural land off Kennedys Bush Rd.

Oakvale Farm Ltd has applied to the Christchurch City Council for land use and subdivision consent so it can develop land it owns between Kennedys Bush Rd and Glovers Rd for housing.

Currently the site is used for grazing and pastoral farming but Oakvale Farm, owned by developer Philip Carter, wants to create 207 residential sections ranging in size from 388sqm to 821sqm as well as six development allotments for medium-density housing.

The development allotments would cover about 1.76 hectares and have at least 45 residential units.

The company is also proposing setting aside a 2545sqm development allotment for a possible future commercial centre.

In its planning application Oakvale Farm says its proposed development would help meet the increased demand for residential land within Christchurch City and offset the "retirement" of urban areas red-zoned since the quakes.

"This application seeks to facilitate residential subdivision and development of the land as a matter of urgency," it says.

"The proposal will have only minor actual or potential effects on the environment."

But some residents living near the proposed subdivision have concerns about the suitability of the land for housing.

One long-term resident told The Press the land was very wet and prone to flooding. After the quakes sinkholes had appeared in places and there was also liquefaction.

"I wouldn't have thought it was at all suitable for building on." Chrys Horn, who is chairwoman of the Kennedys Bush Rd Neighbourhood Association, was yesterday resigned to the subdivision going ahead but said she hoped attention would be paid to how it was integrated into the existing traffic network.

Public submissions on Oakvale Farm Ltd's application close on February 7.

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- The Press

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