Street art showcase at demolition house

19:34, Aug 17 2014
graffiti house 1
ART HOUSE: Ren Bell's house is covered in graffiti inside and out. The quake-damaged Cranford St house is open to the public until its demolition.
art house gallery 2
ART HOUSE: Ren Bell's house is covered in graffiti inside and out. The quake-damaged Cranford St house is open to the public until its demolition.
art house gallery 3
ART HOUSE: Ren Bell's house is covered in graffiti inside and out. The quake-damaged Cranford St house is open to the public until its demolition.
art house gallery 4
ART HOUSE: Ren Bell's house is covered in graffiti inside and out. The quake-damaged Cranford St house is open to the public until its demolition.
art house gallery 5
ART HOUSE: Ren Bell's house is covered in graffiti inside and out. The quake-damaged Cranford St house is open to the public until its demolition.
art house gallery 6
ART HOUSE: Ren Bell's house is covered in graffiti inside and out. The quake-damaged Cranford St house is open to the public until its demolition.
art house gallery 7
ART HOUSE: Ren Bell's house is covered in graffiti inside and out. The quake-damaged Cranford St house is open to the public until its demolition.
art house gallery 8
ART HOUSE: Ren Bell's house is covered in graffiti inside and out. The quake-damaged Cranford St house is open to the public until its demolition.
art house gallery 9
ART HOUSE: Ren Bell's house is covered in graffiti inside and out. The quake-damaged Cranford St house is open to the public until its demolition.

A Christchurch bungalow due for demolition has been given a final makeover. 

Graffiti artists from around the city have painted street art inside and outside a St Albans property belonging to Ren Bell. 

The house, at 38 Cranford St, was damaged in the earthquakes and is due to be demolished this week. 

Street Art House
ART HOUSE: Greg and Maree Johnston with their dog Tagen view some of the street art in Ren Bell's bungalow, which is due to be demolished this week,

Bell has opened up his home to the public for three days. 

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