$70k contest for Lyttelton spruce-up

$70,000 contest to spruce up heritage site

SAM SACHDEVA
Last updated 08:22 02/01/2013
London St site

TOWN CENTRE: The council hopes to turn the former cafe-deli site into a public square for Lyttelton.

Ground Culinary Centre
GONE: The Ground Culinary Centre was demolished after being severely damaged by the quakes.

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Christchurch artists are being given a chance to showcase their talents and brighten up Lyttelton's future civic square.

The Christchurch City Council has opened a contestable $70,000 fund for artists to pitch temporary projects for the site at 44 London St.

In July, the council bought the site where the heritage Albion building once stood, home of the earthquake-hit Ground Culinary Centre.

The council plans to transform the site into an outdoor gathering space for Lyttelton residents.

Lyttelton artist and Harbour Arts Collective spokesman Trent Hiles, who helped the council to develop the transitional project, said residents wanted to "bring life" to the area while permanent- construction plans were being developed.

The funding could go to one large project or several smaller ones, with applicants given "a blank canvas" to work with.

Hiles said artists had been hit hard by the quakes and needed more chances to show off their talents.

"We've lost studio spaces, we've lost gallery spaces, so it's important that we provide artists with opportunities to put their work on public display within their own community."

He said there was already strong interest from Lyttelton artists.

He hoped good projects could find a permanent home in the area.

"I can imagine that if there's a work created with enough significance it could well remain and be permanently installed," he said.

In the council's master plan for the township, the London St site could become the new home of the Lyttelton War Memorial Cenotaph.

Funding applications for the project will close on January 31.

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- The Press

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