When farming and sculpture merge

Sculpture on Peninsula winner revealed

LEITH HUFFADINE
Last updated 19:30 08/11/2013
Sculptor Tim Wraight
WINNER: Sculptor Tim Wraight

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Banks Peninsula is again the setting of a marriage between two New Zealand icons.

Farming and sculpture have been integrated in the 2013 Sculpture on the Peninsula exhibition held on Loudon Farm.

Christchurch Art Gallery curator Felicity Milburn said it was pleasing to see artists responding directly to the landscape on Banks Peninsula and Loudon Farm.

"From small, exquisitely crafted gestures to expansive visions, the exhibition will again provide satisfying and thought-provoking viewing in a truly distinctive setting."

Sculptor Tim Wraight was the winner of the exhibition's $10,000 major award with an artwork titled The Red and Black Portal from the Marae at Otuwhero.

In addition to the major award, a people's choice award worth $1500 is to be given out.

The exhibition featured works from 53 New Zealand sculptors, displayed in locations about the farm.

One artwork, featuring British woodland animals battling each other, can be found amongst an area of trees and in another, carbon work boots sit outside a farm dwelling as if removed before going indoors.

Many well-known New Zealand sculptors have work displayed alongside new and emerging artists in the exhibition, selected from over 80 submissions.

Milburn said she was impressed by the number and quality of works.

"As in previous years, the entries illustrate the rich variety of sculptural practice that exists in New Zealand."

Sculpture on the Peninsula has been held biennially since 2000 as a fundraiser for Cholmondeley Children's Home, having already contributed $500,000.

Tickets for the three-day exhibition are available online and at the gate until the exhibition finishes on Sunday.

For more information go to the Sculpture on the Peninsula's website.

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