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Sculptures shown down on the farm

Last updated 09:34 09/11/2013
Sculpture on the Peninsula
John Kirk-Anderson/Fairfax NZ
WINNING WORK: Sculpture on the Peninsula organiser Gill Hay inspects Tim Wraight's winner, The Red and Black Portal from the Marae at Otuwhero.
Sculpture on the Peninsula
John Kirk-Anderson/Fairfax NZ
HOLIDAY APPEAL: Peter Davie with Topspot, a sculpture by Hannah Kidd.

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Banks Peninsula is again the setting of a marriage between two New Zealand icons.

Farming and sculpture have been integrated in the 2013 Sculpture on the Peninsula exhibition, being held on Loudon Farm.

Christchurch Art Gallery curator Felicity Milburn said it was pleasing to see artists responding directly to the peninsula landscape.

Sculptor Tim Wraight was the winner of the exhibition's $10,000 major award with an artwork titled The Red and Black Portal from the Marae at Otuwhero.

Judge Lara Strongman said Wraight's sculpture was an imaginative act which balanced extraordinary craftsmanship with bold intellectual inquiry.

A people's choice award worth $1500 will be announced tomorrow.

The exhibition features works from 53 New Zealand sculptors, displayed in locations about the farm.

One work, showing British woodland animals battling each other, can be found among trees and in another, carbon workboots sit outside a farm dwelling as if removed before the wearer went indoors.

Milburn said she was impressed by the number and quality of works.

"As in previous years, the entries illustrate the rich variety of sculptural practice that exists in New Zealand."

Sculpture on the Peninsula has been held biennially since 2000 as a fundraiser for Cholmondeley Children's Home, having already contributed $500,000.

Tickets for the three-day exhibition are available online and at the gate until the exhibition finishes tomorrow.

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- The Press

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