World famous in NZ: Whittaker's Music Museum, Waiheke

PAMELA WADE
Last updated 05:00 05/02/2017
Pamela Wade

Lloyd and Joan Whittaker, now in their 80s, have been dedicated their lives to music.

Pamela Wade
The Whittaker's Museum in Waiheke.
Pamela Wade
Lloyd and Joan give weekly talks and demonstrate many of the instruments at the museum.
Pamela Wade
An ornately decorated accordion.
Pamela Wade
Lloyd Whittaker plays one of the museum's accordions.
Pamela Wade
This piano with striking Egyptian decoration is part of Whittaker's Music Museum's collection.

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WHERE/WHAT IS IT?

In the Artworks complex on the hill above the village of Oneroa, on Waiheke Island, you'll find an unexpected hoard of priceless musical treasures in this unpretentious museum – from an 1877 New York theatre organ to a simple harmonica. Never static, the collection of accordions, violins, dulcimers, harpsichords, pianolas, harps, and more has been recently joined by a 120-year-old Wellershaus pipe organ from Germany, donated by Motat and currently being restored. All the instruments here are carefully maintained and regularly played: it's a matter of pride that this is a live museum, one of very few in the world.

WHY GO?

Equally a treasure are Lloyd and Joan Whittaker, now in their 80s, whose lives have been dedicated to music and have wonderful stories to tell. In their weekly show, Lloyd talks about his isolated Taranaki childhood when, starting with a mouth organ at the age of 5, he went on to teach himself to play six instruments by ear. It was the beginning of a career in music that has brought him to this room crammed with rare and unique stringed and keyboard instruments, squeezeboxes, and mouth organs, the result of a lifetime's obsessive collecting. Some of these instruments have fascinating life histories of their own, brought to New Zealand on sailing ships and dragged up-country on bullock carts. Playing music from Mozart to Lloyd Webber by way of Old MacDonald, Lloyd and Joan demonstrate many of the instruments, ending with a duet on a nine-foot Bechstein concert grand.

INSIDER TIP

Take someone musical – visitors are welcome to ask questions and play the pianos. Where else could you tickle the ivories of a concert grand once owned by the Lloyd Webber of the  19th century, the composer (and also Polish Prime Minister) Ignacy Paderewski? Or play New Zealand's oldest Steinway? Ask nicely, and they'll flick the switch of the orchestrion for you: seven instruments in one. And look out for the next concert: there's a programme of visiting musicians who come from all over the world, delighted to lay their hands on these treasures.

ON THE WAY/NEARBY

There's the adjoining Art Gallery, with changing exhibitions by local artists, the Community Cinema where the seats are all squashy sofas and there might be lost coins down the sides of the cushions, the Artworks Theatre, and the striking new library. Had enough culture? Go down into the village for shops, coffee, gelato, restaurants, and views over the bay. Cable Bay Vineyards are within walking distance; there are many other wineries just a bus or taxi ride away. And on Waiheke, you're never far from a beach.

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HOW MUCH?

To look around, a donation of $5 is welcomed. For the Saturday show, it costs $12.50 for adults, $10 for senior citizens, and $8 for students. Accompanied children are free.

BEST TIME TO GO

On a Saturday at 1.30pm, for the 90-minute live show with Lloyd and Joan. The museum is open 1pm-4pm daily, sometimes from 10am on busy weekends. See www.musicalmuseum.org

- Stuff

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