Sacked principal's case due to be heard

TINA LAW
Last updated 05:00 20/11/2012
Prue Taylor
John Kirk-Anderson

SACKED: Prue Taylor.

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Sacked Christchurch Girls' High School principal Prue Taylor will make her case to get her job back tomorrow.

Taylor is seeking interim reinstatement through the Employment Relations Authority after she was dismissed by the school's board of trustees on November 2.

Her lawyer, employment law specialist Richard Harrison, said the public hearing was the first round to decide what to do in the interim before a substantive hearing.

The hearing tomorrow would not discuss the merits of the case, but would look at the practicalities of what to do in the interim, he said.

The hearing would be held at the Sudima Hotel in Memorial Avenue at 9.30am.

The authority could consider options including reinstating Taylor until the main hearing, a partial reinstatement with limited duties or the status quo with Taylor not at the school.

The board has refused to say why Taylor was sacked other than that "issues and tensions" had existed between Taylor and the board for a long period.

A wide range of "stakeholder groups" had expressed "issues of concern" with Taylor since 2009, it said.

Harrison said some of the issues would be canvassed at the hearing, which would be based on affidavits produced by both sides.

He believed Taylor's dismissal was unjustified and, after reading the affidavits from the board, he was yet to understand why she was dismissed, he said.

The authority could make a decision tomorrow, but in 90 per cent of cases the authority reserved its decision and provided it in writing within a week, Harrison said.

Taylor said she hoped the hearing would go some way to answering people's questions about her dismissal.

However, she was not sure how much detail would be mentioned.

"She was hoping to be back at Girls' High by the end of the year.

When asked what it would be like working in an environment where you knew your employer did not want you there, Taylor said: "I have worked with this board for the past six years and I've always been prepared to do my best to work with them, so there's nothing different in that respect".

Board chairman James Margaritis would not comment because the issue was before the authority.

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- The Press

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