Crash driver may have had seizure

JOELLE DALLY
Last updated 05:00 14/02/2013
Daniel Tobin

Andrew Tobeck who's life was saved by Liam Robinson and Angus Bailey after his vehicle went into the into the Halswell River, goes back to the scene with his two rescuers.

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There was no ice-breaker needed when Canterbury man Andrew Tobeck met the teenagers who saved his life.

The 30-year-old was yesterday able to thank Angus Bailey and Liam Robinson in person - with a handshake - for dragging him unconscious from his submerged utility vehicle on Sunday afternoon.

Returning to the scene for the first time, at the Halswell River at Greenpark, Tobeck said it was "freaky" to think it could easily have been his final resting place.

The meeting was mostly laughs as the 14-year-olds pointed out to Tobeck where he had gone in and the details of the dramatic rescue.

Tobeck had been travelling in River Rd when he "blacked out" and crashed into a deep ditch in the river about 5.45pm.

Swimming nearby were Angus and Liam, who biked to the scene and dragged Tobeck out of the ute.

Angus held Tobeck on the riverbank while Liam ran to a nearby house to raise the alarm.

Their actions earned them praise from Prime Minister John Key.

Both teenagers agreed it was good to see Tobeck walking and talking, rather than "moaning" while unconscious on Sunday.

Angus said the best reward was that "it all turned out fine".

Tobeck said doctors had told him he had probably suffered a seizure. He had also been tested for a heart condition.

They had forbidden him from driving for six months, he said.

While that would affect his agricultural and horse stud work, he planned to rest then hopefully have life "go back to normal".

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