Filling earthquake gaps the creative way

CHARLEY MANN
Last updated 09:45 26/05/2011
Gapfiller
Empty potential: Gap Filler co-creator and director Coralie Winn and CPIT head of school of Architectural Studies Keith Power at one of two empty sites ready to be brought back to life by CPIT stdents.

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Architecture students are racing against the clock this week, with just four days to breathe life into sites left vacant by the February 22 earthquake.

Gap Week teams 80 CPIT architecture students with Gap Filler, an initiative first started after the September earthquake to bring temporary creative arts projects to vacant sites around the city.

Students were given a brief yesterday morning and had three hours to develop ideas.

Gap Filler members then selected two designs, which will be created at 270 St Asaph St and 19 Ferry Rd.

''It's not just studying, drawing or documenting something; it's actually making it real,'' CPIT School of Architectural Studies head Keith Power said.

Gap Filler co-creator and director Coralie Winn said students had to consider practical public access aspects, such as health and safety, a wet weather plan, and how children might interact with the space.

''This is the first time we have approached a project in this way, handing creative control over to students, so it's quite different for me too. Instead of working with two or three creative people to design a response to a gap site, I'm working with 80 of them,'' she said.

Previous Gap Filler projects have brought live music, performance, dance, film and art to four city sites.

The two sites will be open to the public from 5pm this Friday

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