Shand's Emporium touches down on Manchester St, Christchurch

Kirk Hargreaves

The Shands Emporium building finds a new home alongside the Trinity Church on Manchester Street

Christchurch's oldest wooden commercial building was spotted dangling above the central city on Saturday.

Flood lights illuminated the Shand's Emporium building's green and red facade as contractors prepared to transplant it from its Hereford St site to a nearby lot in Manchester Street from 4am. 

Christchurch Heritage chairwoman Anna Crighton and former owner property developer Antony Gough braved freezing pre-dawn conditions to watch the spectacle unfold.

Shand's at its old site on Hereford St, where it resided since 1860.
KIRK HARGREAVES/FAIRFAX NZ

Shand's at its old site on Hereford St, where it resided since 1860.

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Crighton said a 200-tonne crane lifted the 20-odd tonne structure about three storeys into the air, to clear tram lines.

Shand's, built in 1860, touched down in its new spot next to the Trinity Church about 7am.

Christchurch Heritage Ltd's Anna Crighton and property developer Antony Gough braved an early start and freezing ...
Kirk Hargreaves

Christchurch Heritage Ltd's Anna Crighton and property developer Antony Gough braved an early start and freezing conditions to oversee the building's move.

Crighton said the process went "like clockwork".

"If there'd been just the slightest breath of wind, we couldn't have done it."

Christchurch Heritage would spend $400,000 over the next year to restore Shands before advertising for tenants, she said.

The building was lifted onto a truck about 4am. Crane operators spent two hours readying the structure for lift-off.
Kirk Hargreaves

The building was lifted onto a truck about 4am. Crane operators spent two hours readying the structure for lift-off.

Christchurch Heritage Ltd paid property developer Antony Gough $1 for the Shand's Emporium building earlier this month. 

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Gough spent about $100,000 weather proofing, straightening and protecting the Heritage New Zealand category one building from vandals since the earthquakes.

Gough, whose family owned the Shand's building for more than 75 years, said they could easily have pulled it down, as their insurers had wanted, but they had been determined to save it.

A 200-tonne crane lifted Shand's three storeys into the air, to clear tram wires.
Kirk Hargreaves

A 200-tonne crane lifted Shand's three storeys into the air, to clear tram wires.

Gough was going to sell the building to Redcliffs man Peter Croft but Christchurch Heritage stepped in and offered to buy the building after the scale of the project became too much for Croft.

 - Stuff

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