Disabled residents to move out of home

NICOLE MATHEWSON
Last updated 07:39 30/11/2012
moodie
David Hallett/The Press
Fay Gillman with her adult daughter Leanne who has an intellectually disability and was living at the Mary Moodie trust house in Woolston.

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A group of intellectually disabled people will move out of their home after the Health Ministry pulled funding.

However, the Mary Moodie Family Trust board plans to take legal action against the ministry because of how it has handled months of tension between residents' families and the board and management.

Two temporary managers have been working at the Ferry Rd house since October after at least 16 complaints within six months from family members about the quality of care and management and governance issues.

The trust has a contract with the ministry to deliver care to residents.

The Press reported on Tuesday that a group of parents and welfare guardians, representing 10 residents, had asked the ministry to remove family members from the home immediately.

Today, the residents will move into new homes with another service provider.

The trust board said yesterday that it had prepared a High Court application to review all steps taken by the ministry.

The ministry had failed to give the trust information about the family members' complaints, it said.

"It is the board's intention to proceed with the application for review. The board owes it to itself, its members and its management to put the ministry and the performance of its officials to the test."

The board was "very confident of those proceedings".

"At no time have any of the residents not been subject to a high standard of care. None of the publicised events have arisen as a consequence of any lack of focus or care by the trust board or its management or staff."

The board said it could not continue with the present situation, which was "damaging for the trust and for the residents" and it had no choice but to stop providing services for the current residents.

Ministry disability support services group manager Toni Atkinson said the ministry had tried to work with the board to find a solution that would allow the residents to stay.

"The ministry considers that the trust has breached its obligations under the contract and has not been delivering the required standard of care . . ."

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- © Fairfax NZ News

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