Fugitive teenager jailed for six weeks

DAVID CLARKSON
Last updated 16:09 04/12/2012
jaydon galland
CAUGHT: Jaydon Galland.

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Teen fugitive Jaydon Galland's head was filled with "nonsense" by another resident at the Salisbury Foundation before he absconded, a judge says.

Galland, 18, has been jailed for six weeks for breaching his community detention and intensive supervision by leaving the foundation on November 7.

He was one of three men on the run who were picked up by police at Arthur's Pass on November 13.

Christchurch District Court Judge Christopher Somerville sentenced him today for the two breaches, which involved him leaving the city with an older and more experienced offender who has since been recalled to prison.

"You became negatively influenced by one of the residents and got your head filled with stupid nonsense," said the judge.

Judge Somerville said he absconded when he was six weeks into a sentence that had been designed to "minimise the risks and highlight your potential".

"I'm disappointed with myself, Your Honour," said Galland.

Galland has been in custody for three weeks since his release, so the short jail term will mean he can be released almost immediately. 

He then faces sentencing on a series of other charges on January 24, when the judge has indicated he is likely to impose 100 hours of community work and nine months' supervision with a special condition that he undergo counselling or do programmes as directed by his probation officer.

He will be on bail until then, after admitting six charges of making threats, theft, assault, possession of cannabis and a pipe for smoking it, unlawfully taking a car, and intentional damage.

He was discharged without penalty on several other charges.He is likely to be sent home to Cobden, near Greymouth, to serve that community-based sentence.

The police there knew him well, defence counsel Rupert Glover said at the sentencing.

He said Galland's mother said there were three local constables who were "virtually on-call, 24-seven".

"She only has to phone a cellphone number if there is any incident," she explained.

The family had a good base in the town and asked for Galland to be allowed to serve the sentence there.

Glover said: "He would also be able to return to the Ritalin medication which settles him down, and get back into the mental health system which always has a calming effect."

Galland would be able to do community work four days a week in Cobden, which would keep him occupied.

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He was willing to do that and he would welcome the supervision sentence.Galland admitted breaching the sentences and stealing a knife from the foundation as he left.

He said he took it for camping purposes but the judge said he had already discussed how dangerous it was for him to carry a weapon.

- © Fairfax NZ News

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