'God boxes' pop up around Chch

ANNA TURNER
Last updated 14:58 08/02/2013
God box
IAIN MCGREGOR/Fairfax NZ

QUIET SPACE: Artist Peter Majendie has built several "god boxes" for people to use as prayer or quiet rooms, including this one on the corner of Lyttelton and Cobham streets in Spreydon.

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Feeling in need of some peace and quiet? Why not visit one of the new "god boxes" popping up around Christchurch?

The man behind the 185 empty chairs earthquake memorial, artist Peter Majendie, has a new project - he's putting up a series of "quiet spaces".

Majendie has built several cardboard boxes for people to use as prayer or contemplative rooms.

Designed as a "quiet space", the boxes will be placed around the city for use by the public.

"They've been called everything - containers, god boxes. They can be whatever they want to be to each person. They can be used as changing rooms for all I mind," he said.

"I just thought there was a need for a place of reflection in Christchurch. Even if you have no religious affiliations, you can just sit and have some time out."

Majendie planned to make about 50 boxes, which were 1.2 metres square.

"I am just going to put them around Christchurch, and some churches have expressed interest. People can buy them if they want one and do what they want with it."

His 185 chairs memorial had been the target of vandals in the past, with people stealing and damaging the chairs.

He was "mildly concerned" the same thing could happen to his god boxes.

"They are just made from cardboard, so they could be burnt or kicked in,'' he said.

''I decided it was a risk I had to take because I wanted to go ahead with this project. I hope nothing happens, but you just never know."

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- © Fairfax NZ News

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