Owners delighted with heritage replica of Christchurch's Mayfair building

The upper levels of the three-storey Mayfair building, which has been rebuilt behind a replicated facade.
JOHN KIRK-ANDERSON/FAIRFAX NZ

The upper levels of the three-storey Mayfair building, which has been rebuilt behind a replicated facade.

Workers have removed scaffolding to reveal the replicated facade of the rebuilt Mayfair building in central Christchurch.

The building, at 119-121 Worcester St just east of Cathedral Square, replaces a 1906 brick structure lost in the earthquakes.

It has been rebuilt as a modern, steel-framed building behind a facade of concrete reinforced with fibreglass. 

The Mayfair building was left damaged and exposed in 2011.
STACY SQUIRES/FAIRFAX NZ

The Mayfair building was left damaged and exposed in 2011.

The three-storey building forms part of the Cathedral Junction complex and its upper floors will again be run as an eight-room extension to the Hotel 115 next door.  

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The building is jointly owned by individual unit title holders who are part of the complex's body corporate. 

The building, right, before the earthquakes.
LIZ MCDONALD/FAIRFAX NZ

The building, right, before the earthquakes.

They are now looking for tenants to run a restaurant and bar on the ground floor, to replace restaurant St Germain, which was there before the earthquakes.

Body corporate spokeswoman Karen Leung said they were delighted with the result.

"It was the idea from the start to have the facade replaced exactly. It looks amazing."

The lightweight replica facade was created by Dunedin fibrous plaster company Seddon's from moulds based on the original brickwork and stone detailing. It has the decorative ornate arched windows and ornate parapet of the original. The brick look was recreated by setting colours into the mould.

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Project manager Liz Thompson, of RDT Pacific, said that after a lot of time spent in insurance discussions and planning, construction took just nine months and came in just under the $3 million budget. 

She said there had been worry about the result until the facade started coming out of the moulds, and the result looked "incredible".

The original building was built for engraving firm Moller and Young in 1906, to a design by architect WV Wilson.

 - Stuff

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