Cricket's hot form boosts World Cup sales

MATT RICHENS
Last updated 05:00 12/02/2014

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A surge in form from New Zealand's cricketers is fuelling interest in tickets for next year's Cricket World Cup.

Pre-sales for the 14-nation event, which begins in Christchurch on February 14 next year, have been a roaring success.

The most in-demand games are the New Zealand-Australia match in Auckland and the tournament opener between New Zealand and Sri Lanka.

That match was a fillip for Christchurch, which will also host the opening ceremony.

Public ticket sales open on Friday as part of the organisers' one-year-to-go celebrations.

"The momentum has been building organically," World Cup New Zealand boss Therese Walsh told The Press.

The match allocations, which included seven New Zealand and seven Australian cities, the inclusion of new ground Saxton Oval in Nelson, and the use of the still to be developed Hagley Park, all helped spark the public's interest.

The announcement that ticket prices would be cheaper than some movie sessions and start at as low as $5 for children and $20 for adults had also helped.

Walsh said tournament organisers had been a "bit lucky" with regard to the New Zealand team's hot form.

"It's been truly superb.

"The Black Caps are playing so well and there's real talent and real potential and I think that's exciting people ahead of Cricket World Cup next year," Walsh said.

She vowed to keep the tournament in people's minds.

"Don't you worry about that, I've got a few tricks up my sleeve yet," Walsh said.

Test cricket could be set to return to Christchurch before the World Cup.

Canterbury Cricket boss Lee Germon has requested a test match and a one-day international during Sri Lanka's tour next summer.

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- The Press

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