Buyers nervous of brick homes

Brick homes are slower to sell, say agents

AUDREY MALONE
Last updated 05:00 19/03/2014
Two storey brick house

ONCE SOUGHT-AFTER: Beautiful two-storey brick homes have fallen out of favour with some buyers.

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A drop in demand for two-storey brick houses may be due to misguided concerns about their safety in earthquakes.

In South Canterbury, Mike Pero Real Estate's Graeme Wilson said brick houses were slow to sell.

"My experience is people don't seem to want to buy two-storied brick houses at the moment.

"People seem to be nervous about the perception of potential earthquake damage," Wilson said.

He said he believed there was no substantial evidence that two-storey brick houses were structurally any less safe than other houses in the region.

Harcourts Real Estate agent Roger Holding said he noticed people from Christchurch were influencing the property market, not just in Timaru but across the country.

He said brick houses, especially the two-storey ones, were not as desirable as they used to be.

"There is actually nothing wrong with them.

"The value has gone from them, which is driven from Christchurch.

"We are hearing the same thing from our Harcourts offices across New Zealand," Holding said.

However, Professionals Timaru director Carl Slade said it would be irresponsible to say the reason that type of house was taking longer to sell was because people were wary of structure strength.

"Ten to 15 years ago there was a great demand for those houses, but people who are now wanting to spend $600,000 on a house have a larger range of options."

Meanwhile, builder Rickie Shore said he had not come across any structural issues as a result of the earthquakes in two-storey brick houses, only minor hairline cracking.

"People are running a bit scared at the moment, but I think it's because they aren't getting the right information," Mr Shore said.

Consulting engineer Gary Littler said two-storey brick houses were not as safe as single-storey brick houses, which were not as safe as light timber-framed houses, but there was no need to be concerned about the structural safety of the brick houses.

"Everything I have seen seems to be secure.

"The only thing is to have a good look at the chimney and make sure it is secure; otherwise there is nothing for people to be worried about," Littler said.

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- The Timaru Herald

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