Two demolition plans considered

Last updated 05:00 13/07/2011
Clarendon Tower
DANGEROUS NEIGHBOUR: Clarendon Tower poses a threat to neighbouring buildings and its demolition has been ordered by Cera.

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Owners of the quake-crippled Clarendon Tower have submitted two demolition plans, including one option using explosives.

The Canterbury Earthquake Recover Authority (Cera) said yesterday the 17-storey building's owners had offered a plan to demolish the building through conventional deconstruction or by implosion.

Regardless of which method was chosen, the demolition should be complete by the middle of next year, Cera said.

The building was in a "dangerous state" and some of the thousands of files and equipment trapped within would never be recovered.

"Both methods will allow some retrieval of property but neither method will allow full retrieval of all property," Cera said.

Knight Frank director and Clarendon Tower manager Andy Bell refused to comment on the building's fate, saying discussions were continuing.

Cera served the building owners a demolition notice last month, requiring them to produce an acceptable demolition plan within 10 days.

However, Knight Frank have not told tenants whether a demolition plan has been submitted or how it might affect access to the building.

Law firm Anderson Lloyd occupied the building's 10th and 17th floors, and chief executive Bill Eade said there had been very little information since the demolition notice was issued.

"I think the lawyers from insurers and Cera are still talking about what to do.There is a lot of money at stake."

The building's engineers had told him the June 13 quakes had caused substantial new damage. He still hoped to recover equipment and files from the building.

Duncan Cotterill partner Helen Smith said the last tenants' meeting with Knight Frank was on May 5 and since then the sparse information provided had been "very frustrating". The latest update from Knight Frank had said bracing of the building was continuing and would allow temporary access to level 12 and above. It was unclear when other tenants could retrieve property.

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- The Press


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