Red-green boundaries raise issues

MICHAEL WRIGHT
Last updated 05:00 23/08/2011
Kaiapoi
IAIN McGREGOR/ The Press
IN DEEP: Owen Trowbridge, 16, and Cameron Ellen, 18, walk through a deep crack in Kaiapoi after September's earthquake.

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Christchurch Earthquake 2011

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The dividing line between Kaiapoi's new red and green zones will be a tricky part of the rebuild to manage, an official says.

Earthquake Recovery Minister Gerry Brownlee announced last week that 860 houses in the town's orange zone would be red-zoned because their land was too badly damaged to be repaired.

Notification letters sent to those homeowners, plus 80 who have been red-zoned in Pines Beach and 220 green-zone houses in northern Kaiapoi, should be received this week. Waimakariri District Council earthquake recovery manager Simon Markham said maintaining the red-green boundary would be delicate work.

"There are some utilities that pass through the red zone that are strategic, like big-diameter sewerage pipes that service much larger areas. We need to look at utilities and roading layout that will need to be in place within the red zone and make sure green-zone people are effectively serviced."

"Potential cul-de-sacs" could emerge in the green zone if boundaries were not properly managed, he said.

Residents who had been given the all-clear on Thursday could expect swift action on the rebuild.

"Those folks that are now confirmed green need to get repairs made to their homes done in as speedy a way as possible. Get them back to normal.

"We'll be re-engaging with ... the insurance companies as they now see what their programme of work is in the green zone."

The executive manager of AMI's quake response team, Peter Rose, said the speed of the works would depend on claimants.

"Everyone's been holding off awaiting a land decision, which is made now, so things will start happening. We're in the customers' hands to a fair degree. Until such time as they make those decisions we're not really in a position to progress."

AMI had done assessments on more than 75 per cent of the claims it received from the Waimakariri District.

Activity would "undoubtedly" surge as residents moved on Government offers over the next nine months, he said.

Community meetings would be held the week after next for residents to voice concerns, Markham said. "Both green and red and people who are still unfortunately orange will have an opportunity to ask questions of us and [the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority] and we'll also be wanting to engage with town-centre businesses classified in the white zone."

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