Firms target high-rise buildings

MICHAEL WRIGHT
Last updated 05:00 17/11/2011

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Christchurch Earthquake 2011

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A construction company and a demolition company have joined forces to work on Christchurch's earthquake recovery.

Arrow International and Nikau Contractors will together target the biggest demolition jobs in the quake-hit central city, promoting themselves as a one-stop shop with all the required engineering, management and deconstruction capabilities.

Arrow director Ian Smith said the two companies were already working as one, "targeting the technically challenging high-rise buildings".

The partnership should cement the companies' positions at the forefront of the quake recovery market, he said.

The addition of Twinkle Toes, a 208-tonne excavator with a 65-metre reach, to Nikau's crane fleet boosted the partnership's credentials, Smith said.

"There wouldn't be a building in Christchurch that we would be afraid to take on."

The pair have worked together on several demolition projects, including the Eastgate Mall car park, Riverlands House on Victoria St and several churches.

Nikau director Diana Stil said the alliance would make the biggest deconstruction jobs easier for both parties.

"There's a lot of issues dealing with these damaged buildings that construction companies understand because they are the ones that constructed them.

"A lot of it is to do with the design of the building and where the damage has occurred. A lot of that damage we've not experienced before."

The alliance was part of a long-term strategy for Nikau, she said.

"We need to look beyond [the recovery]. We're looking at future work nationally. We're looking long term ... with Arrow in terms of the reconstruction work as well.

"There's a lot of buildings there that aren't going to be demolished but there's going to be a lot of partial deconstruction work to enable new buildings, strengthening work, that type of thing."

Nikau moved to Christchurch after the February quake and wanted to stay in the city post-recovery, Stil said.

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