No repairs for oldest active police station

Last updated 05:00 30/12/2011
GUTTED: Sergeant Gary Manch who like his colleagues is disappointed the historic Lyttelton Police Station is too damaged by earthquakes and aftershocks to be repaired.

Relevant offers

Christchurch Earthquake 2011

Court rules quake-damaged Lladro figurines are artworks CTV to debut doco series on East Christchurch Wife creates dream garden for quake amputee husband Brian Coker Heritage stone church rebuild Heartbroken parents break silence to honour the extraordinary life of Brigitte Nimmo Daughter of EQC executive being investigated again EQC faces court challenge over repair policies Young Cantabrians to have their say in shaping of Christchurch Late, inadequate and frequently defective 'Inquisitive' duo caught inside Christ Church Cathedral

The earthquake-damaged Lyttelton Police Station will not be repaired. The station, the oldest working station in New Zealand, was hit hard in the February 22 quake and suffered more damage in the aftershocks.

Southern area commander Inspector Malcolm Johnston said that after months of engineering investigations, police had decided it was too expensive to fix the station.

"This is sad news for police, for our local staff and for the Lyttleton community," Johnston said.

"However, we have received advice that to repair the building to an adequate standard would cost at least $1.5 million.

"That is significantly more than the cost of a new station.

"Last week's earthquakes caused significant additional damage and will have further increased the cost of repairs."

Lyttelton police have been working out of a garage next to the station since February and will move into portable buildings in coming weeks.

More temporary facilities are likely to be added.

Sergeant Gary Manch said staff were "gutted".

"We love the old station, but Friday was the final straw for the old building," he said.

"The staff are obviously upset."

"It was the oldest operational police station in New Zealand and I don't want to be known as the last sergeant to work there.

"We'll still be working from Lyttelton. The people of Lyttelton are important to us.

"I guess we'll just have to reminisce about the old building."

Manch said staff would move into portable cabins in the next week or two.

Johnston said police may now look at developing a shared facility in Lyttelton with other emergency services.

"There's an increasing realisation that it makes good sense for the services to co-locate and share facilities," Manch said.

"This provides us a good opportunity to look at whether such a solution would work for Lyttelton.

"At this stage no decisions have been made and it's too early to say what any future facility might look like."

During the February 22 earthquake, the Lyttelton Police Station suffered significant structural damage, including extensive cracking to the exterior walls.

The station was built between 1880 and 1882. The building would be inspected by an engineer next week and a decision on its demolition would be made after that, Johnston said.

Ad Feedback

- The Press


Special offers
Opinion poll

Which memorial design do you like most?

Memorial Wall with a reflective pond

Table and Chairs

A Green and Peaceful Landscape

Call and Response

Riverside Promenade

A Curved and Inclusive Memorial Wall

Vote Result

Related story: Christchurch earthquake memorial designs unveiled

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content