Bus tours show 'life after man'

CBD bus tours a glimpse of 'life after man'

RACHEL YOUNG
Last updated 13:58 16/07/2012
Daniel Tobin

The media are given a preview of the red-zone bus tour that will start for the public on Tuesday.

bus tour
David Hallett
PREVIEW: Bus driver Dale Pohio takes the media for a preview bus tour through the Christchurch CBD before tours start for the public.

Relevant offers

Christchurch Earthquake 2011

Kids need reassurance over news reports Quake-prone centre 'unsafe to occupy' Peters claims quake workers weren't paid Quake refugee's career takes off EQC letter cold comfort to flooded resident Aussies offer rebuild help CBD scene compared with 100 years ago Flood-hit families ineligible for claims The Christchurch Town Hall must be saved EQC staffer denies misusing cars

Passengers on the red-zone bus tour are being given a glimpse of ''life after man'' as the bus weaves its way through central Christchurch.

The latest addition to the Red Bus fleet will take people behind the central-city cordons, starting tomorrow.

The tours feature a new ''streamlined'' bus, complete with two large video screens that will display pre-earthquake images, accompanied by a commentary from a Canterbury Museum guide.

A trial run with the media onboard was held today.

The bus weaves from outside the Canterbury Museum past Cranmer Square, along Salisbury and Barbadoes streets and into the cordoned-off central city, including through Cathedral Square.

It stops outside the Canterbury Television site, where 115 people died, and beside quake-hit Christ Church Cathedral.

Museum guide Virginia Malcolmson said the tours were designed to tell people about the quakes, what had happened since and what would happen next.

As Malcolmson talks, images of Christchurch before and after the quakes flash up on the screens.

What has come down, what will come down and what is coming down are pointed out.

Malcolmson described looking at Victoria Square as seeing a glimpse of ''life after man''.

Red Bus chief executive Paul McNoe hoped the tours would tell Christchurch's story.

''It's saying this event's happened, but here's why, '' he said.

''It's talking about where the city's going and about the recovery process.''

The tours will run daily between 10am and 2pm. They will last about half an hour and cost $15.

Ad Feedback

- The Press

Comments

Special offers
Opinion poll

Should the Canterbury Provincial Council buildings be restored?

Yes, they are NZ's best example of high Victorian gothic revival architecture.

Only if the cost can be brought down.

No, $70 million could be used for more important things.

Vote Result

Related story: Provincial chambers repair bill $70m

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content