QuakeBox shifts to New Brighton

ANNA TURNER
Last updated 15:38 17/07/2012

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Residents in Christchurch's eastern seaside suburbs will be able to record their earthquake experiences, with the relocation of the University of Canterbury's QuakeBox to the New Brighton Library.

Since the QuakeBox recording studio began operating earlier this year, hundreds of Christchurch residents have told their earthquake stories at its previous sites in the Re:Start shopping precinct in Cashel Mall and at the Eastgate Shopping Centre.

The booth would be set up on the courtyard outside the New Brighton Library from July 24.

The QuakeBox was a collaborative project between the New Zealand Institute of Language, Brain and Behaviour (NZILBB) at the University of Canterbury and UC CEISMIC (Canterbury Earthquake Digital Archive), a group of national organisations that aim to gather and preserve digital content related to the Canterbury earthquakes.

NZILBB director Professor Jen Hay said the QuakeBox would be an invaluable archive and research tool in the future.

"We really want all kinds of stories, not just the dramatic ones. And we are also interested in stories about life post-earthquake - about the challenges associated with rebuilding, moving, dealing with insurance issues and other matters," she said.

"We are looking to get as wide a cross-section of people as possible, in as many languages as possible. We are also very keen to record those who are multi-lingual so we can compare the content and how they tell their same story in different languages."

Those taking part have the option of an audio or video recording which would then be used by people who research storytelling, language and earthquakes to better understand people's experiences of the earthquakes and also to study how people tell stories, Hay said.

There were several confidentiality options available to those taking part. Storytellers could choose whether to participate anonymously or have their name associated with their story and whether the video was stored or only the audio.

They could also choose who could access their recorded story - from allowing only researchers to have access, through to having the stories widely available to a worldwide audience.

Participants would be able to change their consent options once they had recorded the story.

The move by the UC QuakeBox to New Brighton was the third in a series of site changes planned to take place until at least the end of the year.

It would be open at New Brighton Library from Tuesday to Saturday, 10am-3pm, until September 1.

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