Injunction could stop implosion

RACHEL YOUNG
Last updated 07:39 26/07/2012
Radio Network House
KIRK HARGREAVES/Fairfax NZ

COMING DOWN: The online auction for the right to blow up Radio Network House has reached over $25k.

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The owner of a building near soon-to-be-imploded Radio Network House may seek an injunction to stop the demolition.

The Westende building, on the corner of Manchester and Worcester streets, is about 80 metres from the 14-storey Radio Network House, which will be reduced to rubble in about 7.7 seconds on Sunday, August 5.

The Westende building owner, KPI Rothschild Property Group managing director Shaun Stockman, was concerned the implosion could cause seismic movement, damage his new building and release noxious contaminants into the air.

"It's just bloody nonsense; it's not acceptable," he said.

Stockman had been told his building's air conditioning had to be switched off and everything had to be sealed.

After the implosion, his building would be washed down at no cost to him.

However, he wanted to get his own team in to seal the building and wash it down, with costs covered by demolition contractor Ceres NZ.

He asked for this and the responses were "cowboyish".

"If we don't get some satisfactory answers and they don't agree to cover all costs, we will seek an injunction [to stop the implosion]," he said.

Ceres operations manager Mark Frame said fears of pollutants and seismic activity were unfounded as geotechnical information and Controlled Demolition, which had done 9000 implosions worldwide, agreed it was safe.

"If he has built to the new code, it will have no effect."

Frame said cleaning the building had been discussed with Stockman, but a decision had not been made.

The landlord for Press House did not agree with seeking an injunction. Ganellen's New Zealand development and business director, Michael Doig, said the company would protect the Press building from dust.

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