CTV families to see final report first

MICHAEL WRIGHT
Last updated 12:08 29/11/2012
CTV
IAIN MCGREGOR/Fairfax NZ

DEATH TRAP: A view of the smoking wreckage of the CTV building seen from a crane.

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Families of those killed in the Canterbury Television building collapse will see a report into the disaster before it is released publicly.

The Canterbury earthquakes royal commission this morning delivered the third and final part of its report to the Governor-General, Sir Jerry Mateparae.

The final three volumes of the seven-volume report into building collapses causing death during the February 2011 earthquake included a report on the CTV tragedy, which claimed 115 lives.

The governor-general will provide the final part of the report to the Government. It is at the Government's discretion when it is made public.

A Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment spokesman said the families of those who died would see the report before its public release, which should be before Christmas.

The final part of the report also deals with roles and responsibilities in the building sector, including the assessment of buildings after earthquakes, training, organisation and regulation in the engineering profession, the building consent process and local government management of earthquake risk.

The royal commission's findings do not determine liability for the collapse and its recommendations are not binding on the Government.

The first three volumes of the report included the investigation into the Pyne Gould Corporation building collapse, in which 18 people died, and included 70 technical recommendations to the Government.

It was released publicly in August.

Volume four contained findings on the failure of 21 buildings during the February quake, that caused 42 deaths.

It also recommended practice, policy and legislative changes to help minimise the risks to public safety from earthquake-prone buildings in earthquakes.

It has not yet been released by the Government.

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- The Press

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