Council quake study results due

Last updated 05:00 03/04/2013

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Christchurch Earthquake 2011

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Detailed engineering assessments of most of the buildings owned by Christchurch City Council should be completed by the end of this month.

Since the quakes the council has been evaluating the safety of 917 non-residential buildings it owns and has been shutting down any that engineers assess as being below 34 per cent of New Building Standard (NBS).

That process has resulted in the sudden closure of dozens of community facilities across the city.

The assessments are nearly complete, with council staff predicting that by the end of this month detailed engineering evaluations (DEEs) will have been completed on all of the non-residential buildings the council owns.

Council staff will still need to review the DEEs, but they expect to have a final assessment on them ready to release to the public by the end of June.

"You shouldn't get any more unexpected closures after then," council community services general manager Michael Aitken said yesterday.

By the end of June the public should also have a clearer picture of what the council plans to do to repair or replace 58 earthquake-damaged facilities that councillors have identified as top priorities for repair or replacement.

Aitken confirmed yesterday that options for repairing or replacing all those facilities would be brought to councillors by the end of June so that they could then make decisions about the buildings' fate.

Included are several significant heritage buildings, including the Canterbury Provincial Chambers and Our City Otautahi.

Engineering assessments done on the 1850s Canterbury Provincial Chambers show that the building is severely damaged and significant portions of it will need to be rebuilt.

Our City Otautahi is also severely damaged. The insured value of $5.8 million is unlikely to cover either of the repair options the council is looking at for the historic Queen Anne building on the corner of Worcester Boulevard and Oxford Tce, one of which has been costed at $10.5m.

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- The Press


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