First houselift in Canterbury 'a success'

First home to be jacked up for quake repairs

NICOLE MATHEWSON
Last updated 08:29 28/05/2013
Houselift in Rolleston
SUPPLIED

LIFT-OFF: Denise Breen's Rolleston house is lifted to allow workers to fix its damaged foundations.

Houselift in Rolleston
DAVID HALLETT/Fairfax NZ
LOOKING GOOD: The new house lifting technology is deemed a success.
Denise Breen
JOHN KIRK-ANDERSON/Fairfax NZ
SWEET HOME: Denise Breen says it is "just good to be home" after five months of repair work on her Rolleston house.

Relevant offers

Christchurch Earthquake 2011

Public asked to stay away from Christchurch police station implosion Trust helps 66 children who lost parent in Christchurch earthquake EQC fights adverse findings against its top engineer Underwrite rents to get homeless off streets - Buck South Canterbury Nepal trust worried following quake Christchurch quake survivors and the long road to mental recovery Nelson woman in Nepal has flashbacks to Christchurch earthquake Squatting in Christchurch's quake abandoned buildings Contractor numbers cut as EQC home repair programme downsizes Rugby union OK with possible Lancaster return

Denise Breen "burst into tears" when she saw her earthquake-damaged home hoisted into the air, but now she couldn't be happier.

The house she owns with husband Phillip was the first to be jacked up for quake repairs on the foundations, and the couple are pleased to be home after the new technology was deemed a success.

They were able to move back into their Brookside Rd, Rolleston, home on May 10 after it was returned to ground level.

Smith Crane and Construction developed the new "high-lift jack plant" over 18 months, with the Breens' property used as a test case to see if it worked.

Breen, 57, said she was "terrified" when the company told her it wanted to lift her home of six and a half years.

"I said, 'No, what if it doesn't work?' [They] said, 'It's simple; if it doesn't work we will build a new one'."

She "burst into tears" when she saw her home lifted by the jack, but it was now impossible to tell the house had been moved.

"We couldn't ask for something better. The way it was left it was just like we hadn't been away. It was all just back together and all nice and clean," she said.

"It's just good to be home."

Building relocation manager Brent Smith said the technology had the potential to save hundreds of homes otherwise deemed beyond repair, and cost about half of what it would to rebuild.

Ad Feedback

- The Press

Comments

Special offers
Opinion poll

Which memorial design do you like most?

Memorial Wall with a reflective pond

Table and Chairs

A Green and Peaceful Landscape

Call and Response

Riverside Promenade

A Curved and Inclusive Memorial Wall

Vote Result

Related story: Christchurch earthquake memorial designs unveiled

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content