Quake sites get a spruce-up

ANNA PEARSON
Last updated 08:47 21/12/2013
CTV clean-up
Joseph Johnson

PICKING UP RUBBISH: Mary-Anne Jackson, left, and Natasha Fernandez help clean up the site of the collapsed Canterbury Television building.

Peter Brown
Joseph Johnson
CLEANING UP: Peter Brown helps clean up the CTV building site.

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Christchurch Earthquake 2011

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A survivor of the Canterbury Television building collapse has helped clean up the site before the holiday period.

The building collapsed during the February 2011 earthquake, killing 115 people. CTV receptionist Mary-Anne Jackson felt the building coming apart as she ran out of the ground floor during the shaking on February 22.

She was among those who yesterday helped to clean the site, which is now owned by the Crown.

A Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority spokeswoman said staff from Cera and City Care cleaned the CTV and Pyne Gould Corporation building sites. They cut grass, sprayed weeds, swept stones, straightened fences and removed rubbish and foliage.

"The spruce-up will ensure the sensitive sites are tidy over the holiday season when many people will visit the sites to pay their respects," the spokeswoman said.

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