Christchurch school heads NZ's Ivy League

KELSEY FLETCHER
Last updated 05:00 03/02/2013
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St Bede's College
ST BEDE'S: Rector Justin Boyle says it is the college's goal to produce leaders.

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Christchurch's St Bede's College has beaten traditional mainstays Auckland Grammar and Christ's College to head an unofficial New Zealand Ivy League.

In a Sunday Star-Times survey of the schools attended by leading politicians, business leaders, government mandarins and the judiciary*, St Bede's topped the list, helped by new parliamentary Speaker David Carter, one of five St Bede's old boys in Parliament.

Auckland Grammar was second and Christ's College, once a prolific producer of parliamentarians, judges and business leaders, was tied for third with Matamata College, Napier's William Colenso College and Palmerston North's Queen Elizabeth College.

While other countries have private schools that routinely produce the next generation of business, state and political leaders, New Zealand is marked by the wide diversity of schools that contribute to our ruling elite.

The 70 leaders asked to provide information on their schooling came from 59 separate schools. Of those, 49 were New Zealand schools, the majority of them state schools from every corner of the country.

In the current National Government - despite the St Bede's influence - nearly three-quarters were state educated, including Prime Minister John Key.

Only eight of the 35 ministers and political party leaders polled went to state-integrated schools, many of which would have been private when they were students there. Only one politician went to a private school: newly minted minister Nikki Kaye who attended St Kentigern Girls' School - Corran, in Auckland.

St Bede's College rector Justin Boyle said it was his college's goal to produce leaders for society so topping the Star-Times' poll came as a pleasant surprise.

Boyle said St Bede's was part of a strong Marist network that involved students in leadership courses.

"We think [it] gives our boys a structure and a philosophy around how we should lead and that's something that has now become institutionalised in our place," he said.

In the poll, the private-public contrast was greatest among top civil servants and the judiciary. Four out of our five Supreme Court judges were privately educated and among the chief executives of New Zealand's 10 biggest government departments, the five New Zealanders were all educated privately (the other five were educated overseas).

That is in stark contrast to the leaders of our top businesses where almost three-quarters of the chief executives and board chairs of top-10 companies on the New Zealand stock exchange went to public schools.

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Most New Zealanders receive a public education: of the 760,000 current students, 84 per cent are in state schools.

The divide between the largely private-educated state mandarins and the rest of us comes as no surprise to education expert Peter O'Connor, associate professor at Auckland University, who says the old boys' (and girls') network is very much alive, he said.

"It doesn't surprise me that you have people succeeding in the civil service who come from very similar backgrounds. Although public education has been heavily criticised over the past couple of years we do have a system which allows people to, through a system of meritocracy, rise to the top which is really encouraging," he said.

"The figures with the civil service suggest another truth which we've always known, and that is it's not what you learn, it's who you learn with. Private schools offer an education alongside other wealthy, well-positioned people which build the kinds of networks necessary to succeed in a small country."

* The Sunday Star-Times polled 74 leaders: government ministers, party leaders, the Speaker of the House, the governor-general, the chief executives of the top-10 budgeted government departments, the judges of the Supreme Court, the chief High Court judge, the chief District Court judge, and the chief executives and board chairs of the top 10 listed NZX companies. Seventy returned data, 58 attended school in New Zealand.

- © Fairfax NZ News

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