School's possible closure worries mum

TINA LAW
Last updated 05:00 20/02/2013
Talia Menzies, with her sons Cody, 7, right, and Ashton, 3. Menzies is worried at how her family will cope with the proposed closure of Kendal School.
DON SCOTT/Fairfax NZ

UNCERTAIN TIMES: Talia Menzies, with her sons Cody, 7, right, and Ashton, 3. Menzies is worried at how her family will cope with the proposed closure of Kendal School.

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Seven-year-old Cody Menzies had just started walking most of the way to school by himself.

But after Monday's announcement, Cody will lose his independence as his school is set to close.

Cody lives just a few minutes away from Kendal School and his mum, Talia Menzies, lets him walk most of the way on his own, while she watches from the corner.

"I'm going to have to take that opportunity back off him now and say ‘Sorry I'm going to have to drive you to school every day'."

Kendal School is one of seven schools in Christchurch proposed to close. Another 12 are set to merge into six.

A final decision will be announced in late May.

Menzies said there were four other schools she could choose for Cody, but they were further away and meant her son would have to cross busy thoroughfares such as Memorial Ave and Wairakei Rd.

If the closure went ahead, she and her husband, Jeff, would have to consider getting a second car because Menzies takes their vehicle to work in the afternoon and her husband, who works in the morning, picks up Cody from school.

Cody had been at school for three weeks before the February 22, 2011, quake hit.

He had only just started to settle in last year but he was going to have his schooling disrupted again by the move, Menzies said.

She was also concerned about the impact a school closure would have on Cody because his friends could end up scattered across several schools.

"If he has to change schools he'll have new teachers and new kids, everything."

Menzies was hoping the school would survive, but she felt disheartened.

"We've already put a proposal forward and if that was not good enough, what is going to be?"

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