ICC recommends DRS technology for all tests

Last updated 09:58 26/06/2012

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The International Cricket Council wants all member countries to use decision review system technology for every test and one-day international - a move that India still feels is not foolproof.

After a two-day meeting, the chief executives' committee recommended to the ICC Board that if members can finance and obtain the required technology then "DRS should be mandatory for all tests and ODIs" to avoid disputes during matches.

ICC chief executive Haroon Lorgat said in a statement Monday that the game's governing body has made good progress in "independently testing ball tracking and the new enhancements has resulted in the CEC unanimously supporting the ICC cricket committee's recommendation to universally apply the DRS in all test matches and ODIs."

But Board of Control for Cricket in India secretary Sanjay Jagdale said in a statement that BCCI "continues to believe that the system is not foolproof" and it should be left up to the respective cricket boards whether or not to use the DRS for a particular series.

Computer vision technology expert Ed Rosten has conducted independent research on ball tracking that satisfied the CEC committee.

Umpires Steve Davis of Australia and Ian Gould of England made several contentious decisions during the ongoing test between Pakistan and Sri Lanka in which the DRS is not being used.

Sri Lanka Cricket used the technology during the home series against England, but did not opt for it for the series against Pakistan in a move that surprised Pakistan coach Dav Whatmore.

The CEC also recommended that a minimum of two Hotspot cameras - if member countries can afford it - must be included while the number of successful reviews should be retained at two per innings for tests and one per innings for ODIs.

In another development regarding the 50-over format of the game, the CEC agreed with the recommendation of the ICC cricket committee that powerplays be restricted to the first block of 10 overs and batting powerplays of five overs be completed before the start of the 41st over.

A maximum of four fielders are to be allowed outside the 30-yard circle in the non-powerplay overs and the number of permitted short-pitched deliveries should be increased from one per over to two.

The CEC also supported the introduction of day/night tests to attract larger crowds provided both participating countries agree and use a suitable ball as recommended by the ICC cricket committee.

The CEC also asked the Bangladesh Cricket Board and SLC to introduce anti-corruption codes in domestic cricket as soon as possible. It asked Sri Lanka Cricket to implement the code before the start of its Premier Twenty20 League, which is planned for August.

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The CEC also recommended to the board that Bangladesh be directed to deliver a comprehensive report on the allegations of corrupt activities during the recent Bangladesh Premier League.

All the CEC recommendations will now be tabled at the ICC board meeting, which is scheduled to be held in Kuala Lumpur on Tuesday and Wednesday.

- AP

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