Occupy Wall Street sit-in goes global

20:47, Oct 15 2011
Occupy Wall St.
Julia Botello, 85, is escorted out after occupying a Bank of America branch during a Make Wall Street Banks Pay protest march in Los Angeles.
Occupy Wall St.
Protesters march through the financial district during a Make Wall Street Banks Pay protest march in Los Angeles.
Occupy Wall St.
Los Angeles police officers stand next a sign with a picture of Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan outside a Bank of America branch during a Make Wall Street Banks Pay protest march in Los Angeles.
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Members of the crowd react during a visit by filmmaker Michael Moore to the "Occupy Wall Street" protest in Zuccotti Park in New York.
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Police carry away a participant in a march organized by Occupy Wall Street in New York.
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Participants in a march organized by Occupy Wall Street make their way uptown to Union Square Park in New York.
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Protesters march in support of the New York Occupy Wall Street protests outside City Hall in Los Angeles.
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Lincoln Hallgren joins his father during a demonstration in support of the New York Occupy Wall Street protests in front of the Chicago Board of Trade Building in the financial district of Chicago.
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A demonstrator from the Occupy Wall Street campaign holds aloft a sign as the march enters a courtyard near the New York Police Department headquarters in New York.
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A woman reads a copy of a newspaper published by the Occupy Wall Street protesters as she visits Zuccotti Park in lower Manhattan.
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"Occupy Wall Street" demonstrators occupy a park near Wall Street in New York.
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Demonstrators opposed to corporate greed on Wall Street march in the Financial District in New York.
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Day seven of the Occupy Wall Street protests in Manhattan's Zuccotti Park.
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Day 12 of the Occupy Wall Street protests in Manhattan's Zuccotti Park.
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New York's financial district Wall Street remains barricaded to the public and tourists alike
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Protesters of the "Occupy Wall Street" movement.
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"Occupy Wall Street" has effectively shut down the main strip of New York's financial district.
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The "Occupy Wall Street" movement has spread to other cities, including Boston.
Occupy Wellington
Protesters in the Occupy Wellington group rally this afternoon.
Occupy Wellington
Protesters in the Occupy Wellington group rally this afternoon.
Occupy Wellington
Protesters in the Occupy Wellington group rally this afternoon.
Occupy Wellington
Protesters in the Occupy Wellington group rally this afternoon.
Keisha Castle-Hughes
Actress Keisha Castle-Hughes gets involved in the protest in Auckland.
Wall St protests - Auckland
A protester on Auckland's Queens Street in an anti-capitalist march with the aim of setting up camp in Aotea Square until November.
Wall St protests - Auckland
Protesters on Auckland's Queens Street in an anti-capitalist march with the aim of setting up camp in Aotea Square until November.
Wall St protests - Auckland
Protesters aligning themselves with the global Occupy movement set up camp in Aotea Square in October.
Occupy Miami
Demonstrators take part in the Occupy Miami protest.
Occupy Lisbon
A demonstrator in a Guy Fawkes mask at the Portuguese parliament as part of the United for Global Change movement in Lisbon.
Occupy Mexico City
'Occupy Together' activists hold signs during a gathering of demonstrators near the Monument of the Revolution in Mexico City.
Occupy Miami
Demonstrators take part in the Occupy Miami protest in Miami, Florida.
Occupy Los Angeles
Occupy Los Angeles protesters march in the Protest Against Corporate Greed on their International Day of Action in Los Angeles.
Occupy Boston
A woman carries a sign about voting in US elections at the Occupy Boston encampment in Boston, Massachusetts.
Occupy Los Angeles
An Occupy Los Angeles protester wears a mask marked with '99%' during the Protest Against Corporate Greed.
Occupy Boston
Occupy Boston protesters shout slogans outside the Bank of America building in Boston, Massachusetts.
Occupy San Francisco
Protesters with Occupy San Francisco take part in a demonstration at the Powell Street cable car turn in San Francisco.
Occupy San Francisco
Protesters with Occupy San Francisco take part in a demonstration on the streets of San Francisco.
Occupy Vancouver
Demonstrators dance on the steps of the Vancouver Art Gallery during the Occupy Vancouver Protest.

The past month's Occupy Wall Street movement has inspired a worldwide yell of anger at banks and financiers.

How many will show up, let alone stay to camp out to disrupt city centres for days, or months, to come, is anyone's guess.

The hundreds at Manhattan's Zuccotti Park were calling for back-up on Friday (Saturday NZ time), fearing imminent eviction. Rome expects tens of thousands at a national protest of more traditional stamp.

Few other police forces expect more than a few thousand to turn out on the day for what is billed as an exercise in social media-spread, Arab Spring-inspired, grassroots democracy with an emphasis on peaceful, homespun debate, as seen among Madrid's "indignados" in June or at the current Wall Street park sit-in.

Blogs and Facebook pages devoted to "October 15" - #O15 on Twitter - abound with exhortations to keep the peace, bring an open mind, a sleeping bag, food and warm clothing; in Britain, "Occupy London Stock Exchange" is at pains to stress it does not plan to actually, well, occupy the stock exchange.

That may turn off those with a taste for the kind of anarchic violence seen in London in August, at anti-capitalism protests of the past decade and at some rallies against spending cuts in Europe this year.

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But, as Karlin Younger of consultancy Control Risks said: "When there's a protest by an organization that's very grassroots, you can't be sure who will show up."

Concrete demands are few from those who proclaim "We are the 99 percent," other than a general sense that the other 1 percent - the "greedy and corrupt" rich, and especially banks - should pay more, and that elected governments are not listening.

"It's time for us to unite; it's time for them to listen; people of the world, rise up!" proclaims the Web site United for #GlobalChange.

"We are not goods in the hands of politicians and bankers who do not represent us ... We will peacefully demonstrate, talk and organize until we make it happen."

By doing so peacefully, many hope for a wider political impact, by amplifying the chord their ideas strike with millions of voters in wealthy countries who feel ever more squeezed by the global financial crisis while the rich seem to get richer.

"ENOUGH IS ENOUGH"

"We have people from all walks of life joining us every day," said Spyro, one of those behind a Facebook page in London which has grown to have some 12,000 followers in a few weeks, enthused by Occupy Wall Street. Some 5,000 have posted that they will turn out, though even some activists expect fewer will.

Spyro, a 28-year-old graduate who has a well-paid job and did not want his family name published, summed up the main target of the global protests as "the financial system."

Angry at taxpayer bailouts of banks since crisis hit in 2008 and at big bonuses still paid to some who work in them while unemployment blights the lives of many young Britons, he said: "People all over the world, we are saying 'Enough is enough'."

What the remedy would be, Spyro said, was not for him to say but should emerge from public debate - a common theme for those camping out off Wall Street since mid-September, who have stirred up U.S. political debate and, a Reuters poll found, won sympathy from over a third of Americans.

A suggestions log posted at 15october.net ("This space is ready for YOUR idea for the revolution") range from a mass cutting up of credit cards ("hit the banks where it counts") to "use technology to make education free."

For all such utopianism, the possibility that peaceful mass action, helped by new technologies, can bring real change has been reinforced by the success of Arab uprisings this year.

"I've been waiting for this protest for a long time, since 2008," said Daniel Schreiber, 28, an editor in Berlin. "I was always wondering why people aren't outraged and why nothing has happened and finally, three years later, it's happening."

Quite what is happening, though, is hard to say. The biggest turnouts are expected where local conditions are most acute.

Italian police are preparing for tens of thousands to march in Rome against austerity measures planned by the beleaguered government of Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi.

Yet in crisis-ravaged Athens, where big protests have seen violence at times of late, a sense of fatigue and futility may limit numbers on Saturday. In Madrid, where thousands of young "indignados," or "angry ones," camped out for weeks, many also feel the movement has run out of steam since the summer.

Germans, where sympathy for southern Europe's debt troubles is patchy, the financial center of Frankfurt, and the European Central Bank in particular, is expected to be a focus of marches calling by the Spanish-inspired Real Democracy Now movement.

Complicating German sentiments, however, a series of small bombs found on trains has stirred memories of the left-wing guerrilla attacks that grew in the 1970s from frustration at a lack of change after the student protests of 1968.

CITY OF LONDON

British student protests a year ago were marked by some acts of violence by what authorities say were hard-core anarchists. Days of looting in London in August were put down to motives that mingled political discontent with criminal opportunism.

As an international center of finance, the City of London is key target. But organizers know strong police powers make setting up a Wall Street-style protest camp there far from easy.

"There's quite a bit of fatigue setting in," said one young veteran of last year's protests against higher university fees. "But if it's still going by Monday or Tuesday, I think that will excite students and they will head down. The City is much more the focus of people's anger now, compared to a year ago."

A long Saturday of rallies may start in New Zealand, where the Occupy Auckland Facebook page provides links recommending "suitable clothing ... a sleeping bag, a tent, food" - but, in a family-friendly spirit, strictly no drugs or alcohol.

Asian authorities and businesses may have less to fear, since most of their economies are still growing strongly.

Tracking across the time zones, through towns large and small ("Occupy Norwich!" reads a website from the picturesque English city), the New York example has also prompted calls for similar occupations in dozens of U.S. cities from Saturday.

In Houston, protesters plan to tap into anger at big oil companies. As the world's day ends, hardy souls will be marching in Fairbanks. "We will be obeying traffic lights," insist the authors of OccupyAlaska.org, and they "will be dressed warm."

History suggests such actions are unlikely, of themselves, to change the world. As one anonymous poster at 15october.net writes, "Fleshing out ideas into living reality has always been the bugbear of radical politics."

And while anger at corporate greed is widespread, there are plenty of voters who would agree with the Australian who posted on the OccupySydney site that those marching will be "the lazy, the paranoid, the confused."

But some analysts do see a potential for political change.

Jeff Madrick, a prominent economics writer, speaks warmly of the serious and reasonable debate he found at Zuccotti Park. Revolutions may be rare, but the protests could push lawmakers to act on some of the demands, he said last week: "It may begin to change public opinion enough to give Congress, people in Washington, the courage of their own convictions."

Reuters