Six journalists arrested in new hacking probe

Last updated 05:00 14/02/2013

Relevant offers

World

A group of US inmates saved the life of their supervising officer, when they could have easily escaped French lifestyle blogger Rebecca Burger 'killed by exploding whipped cream dispenser' Canadian sniper shatters world record by killing IS fighter with bullet fired 3.5km away 'Sheer good luck' proved an Air Asia pilot raped an Australian woman in 1996 London fire: Cladding in other UK buildings 'combustible', Prime Minister Theresa May says 29 dead after car bomb hits Afghan bank in restive Helmand province, governor says Prince Harry: No-one really wants to be king or queen Powerful 6.8 magnitude earthquake shakes Guatemala and El Salvador Thousands of Americans unite against hate at funeral for Muslim teen bashed with baseball bat 'All we do is win, win, win': Donald Trump turns rally into a vent session

British police investigating the hacking of mobile phones to generate stories at Rupert Murdoch's now-defunct News of the World tabloid have arrested six more current and former journalists.

The phone hacking in the new arrests was believed to have taken place in 2005 and 2006, the police said.

Five suspects were arrested and taken in for questioning in London and one in Cheshire in northern England.

Operation Weeting was set up to investigate the allegation that journalists and private detectives working for the News of the World tabloid, owned by News Corp's British arm News International, repeatedly hacked into mobile phones.

Revelations the hacking extended from celebrities and politicians to crime victims, including murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler, caused public outrage.

The scandal escalated into a wider crisis embroiling the top echelons of the British political establishment, media, and police, and led to Murdoch closing down the News of the World in July 2011.

The latest arrests involve a suspected conspiracy separate to the one under which charges have already been made.

Earlier this month, a senior police officer was jailed after she was found guilty of offering to sell details about the phone-hacking inquiry to the tabloid, the first person to be convicted as part of the investigation.

Prime Minister David Cameron's former media chief Andy Coulson, who was editor of the News of the World between 2003 and 2007, and Rebekah Brooks, the former boss of News International and a confidante of Murdoch, are among those charged with criminal offences.

Last week, News International agreed to settle most outstanding civil lawsuits brought against it by phone hacking victims, including actor Hugh Grant and Sarah Ferguson, the Duchess of York.

Ad Feedback

- Reuters

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content