BREAKING NEWS
Third round technical knockout for Joseph Parker ... Read more
Close

Glimpse of new Jimi Hendrix album

Last updated 12:08 27/02/2013

Co-producer Eddie Kramer talks about the lead single of Jimi Hendrix' upcoming album and gives us a first taste of what to expect.

Relevant offers

Entertainment

Miss Peregrine author Ransom Riggs on flea markets, Florida and unusual fascinations New Superman Tyler Hoechin set to make his debut on Supergirl Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie agree to temporary custody deal People are more concerned by offensive language on radio: research What to expect when Naz Khanjani and Bella Henry fight REVIEW: Shona Laing, Sharon O'Neill and Debbie Harwood still worth a listen Top gender scholar to lead Beyonce college course Two Van Gogh paintings recovered by Italian anti-Mafia police Canadian prog rockers Black Mountain hit Auckland's Tuning Fork DiCaprio's new doco a 'wake-up call on climate change'

Next week sees the release of People, Hell & Angels, premiering twelve previously unreleased studio recordings by Jimi Hendrix.

The album features material the legendary guitarist worked on outside of the original Jimi Hendrix Experience trio.   

Away from massive audiences that had established the Experience as rock's largest grossing concert act in the last 60s, Hendrix was busy crafting his next musical statement. The 12 tracks showcase a variety of sounds and styles incorporating many elements like horns, keyboards, percussion and second guitar.

On the album, coined by Hendrix himself, People, Hell & Angels he reveals some of his post-Experience ambitions on which he worked with new musicians - including the Buffalo Springfield's Stephen Stills, drummer Buddy Miles, Billy Cox and others.

People, Hell & Angels is co-produced by Hendrix' sister Janie, Eddie Kramer and John McDermott.  Kramer first met Hendrix at Olympic Studios in London in January 1967.  

Hendrix, who would have turned 70 on November 27 this year, developed a unique rapport with Kramer. As a result, Kramer engineered every album issued by the guitarist in his lifetime and recorded such famous Hendrix concerts as the Woodstock festival in August 1969.

"The album is an interesting window into Jimi's mind," Kramer says about the upcoming album.

Unlike contemporaries such as the Beatles or Bob Dylan, Hendrix owned his songs and master recordings.  He did not have to record his music at recording studios owned and operated by his record company.  

Hendrix spent countless hours recording his new music at new, independent music studios such as New York's Record Plant and the Hit Factory, and much of these recordings will now be released for the first time.

Hendrix died in 1970, aged 27, of an exidental overdose.

Jimi Hendrix' People, Hell & Angels will be released on March 8.

Ad Feedback

- Stuff

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content