Clooney's Tequila to fund Sudan help

Last updated 05:00 28/02/2013
George Clooney
BOOZE FOR HELP: George Clooney new line of tequila is helping to keep his Sudanese satellite in place.

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George Clooney's new line of booze is helping to keep his Sudanese satellite in place.

The 51-year-old actor, director and humanitarian recently released tequila named Casamigos.

The alcohol is getting excellent reviews and is selling well.

Clooney is elated by the success of the product, because the profits help fund the satellite in the sky he has hovering over Sudan to keep tabs on the harrowing reign of despotic President Omar al-Bashir.

"Our tequila is doing really well so I'm just going to stick with that for a while," Clooney told E! Online.

"I have a satellite over South Sudan that I'm trying to keep some people alive with. It costs me a lot of money every year so now I'm getting it paid for."

Clooney made the dangerous mission to the volatile border region between Sudan and South Sudan in 2012, ahead of the testimony he gave before a US Senate committee on the humanitarian crisis in the African country.

He and his camera crew witnessed burned-out villages and saw residents seeking shelter in caves following aerial attacks on their homes by Sudan's military.

The guerrilla conflict in the Sudan region of Darfur began in 2003 when the Sudan Liberation Movement/Army and Justice and Equality Movement groups in Darfur took up arms. They accused the Sudan government of oppressing non-Arab Sudanese in favour of Sudanese Arabs.

Clooney described the situation as "ethnic cleansing" and believes it was largely fuelled by disagreements over the oil supplies.

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