Timaru's new residents rate living here

Getting on board with the global village

AUDREY MALONE
Last updated 05:00 13/07/2013
Clarissa Doran
JOHN BISSET/ Fairfax NZ

Australian Clarissa Doran loves living in Timaru after spending six years in Queenstown.

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The world is becoming a global village and Timaru is following the trend.

Australian Clarissa Doran and her Timaru-born husband moved here after spending six years in Queenstown.

"We loved our time in Queenstown but we knew it was our time to leave."

When they met, it was love at first sight - for him. Mrs Doran had to be won over, but win her he did.

When they decided to marry and thought about starting a family, it was decided they would return to Mr Doran's home town.

"Timaru wasn't my first choice, but as Mike grew up here he convinced me that we should come, and I love it."

The couple married in Mr Doran's parents' back yard last December and held their reception at the Landing Services building. Friends and family from other countries attended and their feedback was positive.

"Everyone thought we would get married in Queenstown but loved coming here.

The couple are opening a restaurant in August called The Oxford.

Mrs Doran has integrated into the community and has been blown away by the support she has received from local businesses who want Timaru to grow.

Another newcomer is Filipino Jonan Castillon, who came to Timaru via Auckland.

The pastor and communications worker moved here with his wife and seven-year-old daughter.

The couple wanted to stay in New Zealand but not in Auckland, and their visa required that they were gainfully employed.

After searching, Mr Castillon's wife found employment in Washdyke and so they made the move south.

"Timaru wasn't where we wanted to go but we love it here. The neighbours are so friendly. It's a great community."

Mr Castillon's daughter was teased by her classmates in Auckland, and she was told she did not belong there but has quickly made friends at Waimataitai.

Mr Castillon thought it was ironic that his daughter suffered racism in such a multicultural city but was welcomed in Timaru.

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- © Fairfax NZ News

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