Redruth fees tipped to hit $1.9m

MATTHEW LITTLEWOOD
Last updated 05:00 22/03/2014

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Timaru's Redruth refuse station is tipped to generate nearly $1.9 million in fees in the next financial year, off the back of an "improved economy".

District services manager Ashley Harper said the past couple of years had seen an increase in industrial activity. "As a result, that leads to more material being used, which by extension means more being dropped off at Redruth.

"There's been no particular sector that's led to the increase, it's just been all-around good news," Mr Harper said. "General recycling stays roughly the same volume, most people know how to use the three-bin system."

Industrial users pay a fee based on the weight of waste or refuse material deposited at the site.

According to the Timaru District Council's draft budget, Redruths is projected to generate $1.83m in income for the year-ending June, an increase of nearly 12 per cent on the 2012-13 financial year.

The extra income will go back into the council's accounts to cover the operational costs of the waste management portfolio.

The council's draft budget proposes dropping the average urban recycling rate from $318 per year to $303.

Mr Harper said it was able to drop the average rate due to Redruth's improved commercial performance. He estimated "nearly 80 per cent" of Timaru's waste was recycled.

"People know how to use the bin system, but it's also because we have a really good educator who travels to all the schools and teaches pupils about recycling. That knowledge gets passed up to the parents," Mr Harper said.

Meanwhile, Mr Harper said people could still drop off their television and computer screens at Redruths, but from June, it would likely cost an extra $2 for televisions ($10 to $12) and $4 for computer screens ($6 to $10).

He also said Timaru was not planning to ban collecting plastic bags, as Palmerston North City Council will do from May.

"Plastic bags are a nuisance, but you just have to deal with them, pretty much all of the supermarket shopping comes in them," Mr Harper said.

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- The Timaru Herald

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