'No Pants Subway Ride' takes off

Last updated 12:13 13/01/2014

Relevant offers

Destinations

Family pray for engineer's report to save historic church from wrecking ball Train tours, south-east Asia: On board the Eastern and Oriental Express from Singapore to Thailand European country overlooked by tourists: Slovakia is a worthy destination without the crowds Adele: Would it have been cheaper to fly to Melbourne to see her? Probably Hiroshima: A story of destruction and renewal TripAdvisor names best holiday destinations in New Zealand and the world Banksy hotel without a view opens to guests in Bethlehem Remarkables set to install high-tech new ski lift ahead of new season Japan's subculture of train fanatics: What being a train geek really means in Japan New Zealand's Doubtful Sound described like 'heaven on earth'

Yes, people do ride mass transit. And once a year, they do it without pants.

As part of an international improvisation event called the "No Pants Subway Ride," scores of people  - fully dressed, but only from the waist up - swarmed stations in major cities around the world.

In Los Angeles, captains with nicknames like Agent Meow Meow and Agent Silky gathered groups together along the Red, Gold and Expo and helped new riders pay fares, find their way through Union Station, and change trains.

Started in New York by theater group Improv Everywhere 13 years ago the annnual celebration has since spread to more than 60 cities across the world. 

Spokesman Marc Littman said the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority was aware of the bare-legged group ride, now in its sixth year in LA.

Pantless riders who are otherwise fully clothed won't be cited for indecent exposure, he said.

But, Littman said: "If you're walking around naked, that's a different story."

The local event organisers, an improvisational theater group called GuerilLA, encouraged participants to exhibit kindness toward "civilians" while underground in their underwear. 

"This should also be fun for the passengers who are wearing pants since their most likely reaction to us will be curiosity and amusement," the organizers wrote.

"Don't worry, we'll have plenty of pantless fun when we get off the train and onto the street."

In the "unlikely event you have to re-pants," organisers wrote, participants should pack an extra pair, just in case. 

Los Angeles Times/MCT

Ad Feedback

Comments

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content