China's window to the world

MEGAN WILLET
Last updated 12:17 14/10/2013

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The World Park in Beijing and Window of the World in Shenzhen are two Chinese parks that feature scale model versions of some of the most iconic buildings and landmarks from around the globe.

Artist Ernie Button set out to capture the bizarre assortment of famous structures. Big Ben next to the Arc de Triomphe, the US Capitol Building at the foot of Mount Rushmore, and the mis-titled "Grand Canyon of Colorado" are just a few of wacky instances he came across.

Walking around the sites, Button began to question what a monument truly is, and what makes the experience special:

After having seen the pyramids at World Park, would a person feel it necessary to travel thousands of miles to experience the authentic sight?

And what is a 'real' experience? Even though it feels odd to experience the world in this way, is it really any different than going to grab a meal at a Rainforest Café with the expectation of experiencing the rainforest? 

Button's series "Monumental China" takes us on a journey through these Chinese monument theme parks, all the while playing with scale and our perspective.

- Business Insider

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