China's window to the world

18:47, Oct 14 2013
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A 'giant' woman walks the streets of Venice at the Window of the World, with the Eiffel Tower in the background.
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Spotlights give perspective to the Window of the World's Sphinx with the Pyramids in the background.
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Here's another view of the Shenzhen Pyramids. It looks like it could almost be real, if not for the buildings peaking out in the background.
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Beijing's World Park also has Pyramids. A couple walking by lend perspective to the scene.
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Shenzhen high rises take over the skyline behind Window of the World's Parthenon.
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You could probably climb Window of the World's Mount Everest in record time.
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World Park in Beijing even has its own mini-Great Wall.
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Looking through Stone Henge at the Window of the World, you can see the Eiffel Tower.
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Meanwhile at Beijing's World Park, you can grab a seat and eat beneath the famous French monument.
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The statues of Easter Island look more like lawn ornaments at Beijing's World Park.
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The US Capitol Building sits at the base of Mount Rushmore at Window of the World.
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Here, Big Ben and the Parliament Building are just in front of France's Arc de Triomphe at Window of the World.
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Cambodia's Hindu temple Angkor Wat is overshadowed by Shenzhen's high rises at Window of the World.

The World Park in Beijing and Window of the World in Shenzhen are two Chinese parks that feature scale model versions of some of the most iconic buildings and landmarks from around the globe.

Artist Ernie Button set out to capture the bizarre assortment of famous structures. Big Ben next to the Arc de Triomphe, the US Capitol Building at the foot of Mount Rushmore, and the mis-titled "Grand Canyon of Colorado" are just a few of wacky instances he came across.

Walking around the sites, Button began to question what a monument truly is, and what makes the experience special:

After having seen the pyramids at World Park, would a person feel it necessary to travel thousands of miles to experience the authentic sight?

And what is a 'real' experience? Even though it feels odd to experience the world in this way, is it really any different than going to grab a meal at a Rainforest Café with the expectation of experiencing the rainforest? 

Button's series "Monumental China" takes us on a journey through these Chinese monument theme parks, all the while playing with scale and our perspective.

- Business Insider

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