So, who wants to go to Brazil?

CARNIVAL: Members of Mocidade Samba School show there's no shortage of love at the Rio Carnival parade called "blocos de rua".
CARNIVAL: Members of Mocidade Samba School show there's no shortage of love at the Rio Carnival parade called "blocos de rua".
CARNIVAL: Drum Queen Mariana Rios from the Mocidade Independente samba school leads her team in the Rio Carnival.
CARNIVAL: Drum Queen Mariana Rios from the Mocidade Independente samba school leads her team in the Rio Carnival.
CARNIVAL: Tens of thousands of people cram into grandstands lining the streets of Rio to watch the city's celebration of samba.
CARNIVAL: Tens of thousands of people cram into grandstands lining the streets of Rio to watch the city's celebration of samba.
CARNIVAL: Revellers from the Mocidade Independente samba school make their alien dream a reality in Rio.
CARNIVAL: Revellers from the Mocidade Independente samba school make their alien dream a reality in Rio.
CARNIVAL: Members of Mocidade Samba School weren't monkeying around when they said they'd dress as apes.
CARNIVAL: Members of Mocidade Samba School weren't monkeying around when they said they'd dress as apes.
CARNIVAL: Revellers from the Uniao da Ilha samba school perform from their football inspired float.
CARNIVAL: Revellers from the Uniao da Ilha samba school perform from their football inspired float.
CARNIVAL: Revellers from the Mocidade Independente samba school looked to space for their float theme at the Rio Carnival parade.
CARNIVAL: Revellers from the Mocidade Independente samba school looked to space for their float theme at the Rio Carnival parade.
CARNIVAL: Revellers from the Mocidade Independente samba school light up Rio in fluorescent green.
CARNIVAL: Revellers from the Mocidade Independente samba school light up Rio in fluorescent green.
CARNIVAL: A member of the Uniao da Ilha samba school mounted on a flexible pole tips out over a crowd of thousands in Rio.
CARNIVAL: A member of the Uniao da Ilha samba school mounted on a flexible pole tips out over a crowd of thousands in Rio.
CARNIVAL: Drum Queen Bruna Bruno from the Uniao da Ilha samba school dances at the head of the pack.
CARNIVAL: Drum Queen Bruna Bruno from the Uniao da Ilha samba school dances at the head of the pack.
CARNIVAL: Members of Mocidade Samba School embrace the spirit of the party at Carnival Rio.
CARNIVAL: Members of Mocidade Samba School embrace the spirit of the party at Carnival Rio.
CARNIVAL: Members of Mocidade Samba School brought some Old World flare to the parade.
CARNIVAL: Members of Mocidade Samba School brought some Old World flare to the parade.
CARNIVAL: A carnival float of Mocidade Samba School depicts a religious scene.
CARNIVAL: A carnival float of Mocidade Samba School depicts a religious scene.
CARNIVAL: Former Brazilian model Monique Evans dances with the Mocidade Independente samba school at the Carnival parade in Rio.
CARNIVAL: Former Brazilian model Monique Evans dances with the Mocidade Independente samba school at the Carnival parade in Rio.
CARNIVAL: Members of Uniao da Ilha samba school don't carry glow sticks - they are glow sticks.
CARNIVAL: Members of Uniao da Ilha samba school don't carry glow sticks - they are glow sticks.
CARNIVAL: Members of Uniao da Ilha Samba School show there's plenty of clowning around on the big night in Rio.
CARNIVAL: Members of Uniao da Ilha Samba School show there's plenty of clowning around on the big night in Rio.
CARNIVAL: Revellers from the Mocidade Independente samba school show there's no gender bias in what you wear.
CARNIVAL: Revellers from the Mocidade Independente samba school show there's no gender bias in what you wear.
CARNIVAL: Revellers from the Uniao da Ilha samba school give a new take on the Rubik's cube.
CARNIVAL: Revellers from the Uniao da Ilha samba school give a new take on the Rubik's cube.

So, who wants to go to Brazil?

The South American beauty has certainly been a gift for the television cameras over the past month, with striking images such as the sun rising in front of Rio's Christ the Redeemer statue and sweeping shots across the Amazon rainforest.

(Pictures of beautiful bodies in skimpy swimwear probably haven't done any harm, either.)

The Arena Amazonia soccer stadium is seen in this aerial view taken two days before its scheduled inauguration, in Manaus.
The Arena Amazonia soccer stadium is seen in this aerial view taken two days before its scheduled inauguration, in Manaus.
The Amazonas Theatre is one of the main tourist spots of the city.
The Amazonas Theatre is one of the main tourist spots of the city.
An orchestra practises at the Amazonas Theatre.
An orchestra practises at the Amazonas Theatre.
The Ariau hotel in the Amazon jungle near Manaus
The Ariau hotel in the Amazon jungle near Manaus
The Amazonas Theatre is seen in this aerial view.
The Amazonas Theatre is seen in this aerial view.
The Ariau hotel in the Amazon jungle near Manaus.
The Ariau hotel in the Amazon jungle near Manaus.
The harbour along the Rio Negro, a major tributary of the Amazon River.
The harbour along the Rio Negro, a major tributary of the Amazon River.
Jonathas Pedrosa street in Manaus is decorated for the 2014 World Cup.
Jonathas Pedrosa street in Manaus is decorated for the 2014 World Cup.
 A pedestrian looks at a graffiti in protest against the 2014 World Cup that shows the Brazilian flag painted around a hole in a wall in Manaus.
A pedestrian looks at a graffiti in protest against the 2014 World Cup that shows the Brazilian flag painted around a hole in a wall in Manaus.

After all the hype and excitement of the weekend's World Cup final, are you keen to go and see the host nation for yourself?

Travel agencies and online booking engines say there has been a surge of interest in travel to Brazil in the wake of the event.

Flight comparison website Skycanner says searches for flights to Brazil over the next six months are up a solid 32 per cent on last year's figures.

People walk in Rio Branco square located at Ground Zero of the city of Recife, in northeastern Brazil.
People walk in Rio Branco square located at Ground Zero of the city of Recife, in northeastern Brazil.
 A man walks past the main entrance of the Sao Jose Municipal market.
A man walks past the main entrance of the Sao Jose Municipal market.
An aerial view of the city of Recife.
An aerial view of the city of Recife.

Expedia says demand for Brazil is up 87 per cent on last year, while Flight Centre says many travellers have been looking to factor Brazil into round-the-world airfares.

The managing director of the South America Travel Centre, Alex Burridge, says World Cup-related publicity for Brazil has been "fantastic", with lesser-known destinations featuring along with landmarks.

"People's horizons for what they want to see and do would have been widened beyond Rio and the Amazon," Burridge says.

Sunset on Ipanema beach to show the joy of cariocas (people from Rio de Janeiro) playing "altinho" soccer, a beach game in which the ball can't touch the sand.
Sunset on Ipanema beach to show the joy of cariocas (people from Rio de Janeiro) playing "altinho" soccer, a beach game in which the ball can't touch the sand.
A woman plays "altinho" (loosely translated as "little height"), a soccer game played at the beaches of Rio de Janeiro, in which the ball can't touch the sand.
A woman plays "altinho" (loosely translated as "little height"), a soccer game played at the beaches of Rio de Janeiro, in which the ball can't touch the sand.
The real soccer of Brazil is played at Bom Jesus da Lapa, a town in the interior of Bahia state.
The real soccer of Brazil is played at Bom Jesus da Lapa, a town in the interior of Bahia state.
Women of Xingu Indigenous Park, Para state, Amazon region show football in Brazil does not discriminate by gender or wealth.
Women of Xingu Indigenous Park, Para state, Amazon region show football in Brazil does not discriminate by gender or wealth.

"I think we will see the benefits of that."

The question is how long the interest will last.

A spokeswoman for HotelsCombined, Alycia Simons, says major events such as the World Cup and Olympic Games do tend to create an increase in international bookings after as well as during the event.

Patrons line up for entry to the Rio Scenarium, a samba club in the Lapa district .
Patrons line up for entry to the Rio Scenarium, a samba club in the Lapa district .
This historic flight of stairs, in Rio's downtown area, leads down to a simple square where samba was born as workers from the area gathered on their shared day off.
This historic flight of stairs, in Rio's downtown area, leads down to a simple square where samba was born as workers from the area gathered on their shared day off.
Seen from the second floor, patrons dance to the sound of a samba band at the Rio Scenarium in the Lapa district.
Seen from the second floor, patrons dance to the sound of a samba band at the Rio Scenarium in the Lapa district.
A view of Rio's Avenida Atlantica and the iconic Copacabana Beach.
A view of Rio's Avenida Atlantica and the iconic Copacabana Beach.
The statue of Christ the Redeemer is a popular photo background.
The statue of Christ the Redeemer is a popular photo background.

"The 2014 Sochi Winter Olympic Games saw an 80 per cent increase in international traffic for the summer period following the Olympic Games," Simons says.

"The 2012 London Olympics were very profitable for London, generating increased and more sustained growth in international bookings in the year following the Games."

The travel agency group Escape Travel says the London Olympics produced a marked increase in bookings to Europe.

BIKINI FOOTBALL: A girl plays football on Ipanema beach.
BIKINI FOOTBALL: A girl plays football on Ipanema beach.

While 2012 was all about short stays centred on the event, the following year saw demand for longer holidays.

Research by Roy Morgan in the lead-up to the World Cup found soccer fans were far more likely than the average Australian to want to take a holiday in that part of the world in the next two years.

Those classified as World Cup viewers were 62 per cent more likely to name Mexico, Central and South America as a preferred holiday destination.

However, the hotel comparison company Trivago believes it might be a lot of wishful thinking.

Spokeswoman Bianca Delbao says year-on-year searches for Brazil are up more than 200 per cent but closer analysis suggests interest is in the event rather than the destination.

Much of the increase came in a last-minute surge just before the World Cup started, while hotel prices are set to drop by the end of this week.

"In Rio de Janeiro, for example, the average price of a hotel drops 45 per cent, from $415 per night during the World Cup to $230 per night the week after the final," Delbao says.

The same pattern is emerging for the Glasgow Commonwealth Games, with hotel prices back to normal levels for bookings just one week after the event.

Delbao says for the recent UK rugby visit to New Zealand, the majority of accommodation searches were only for the destinations hosting the games, with search patterns back to normal within a week.

"From our data we can see that that those searching for destinations surrounding events are interested in the events only, rather than the exposure of a country due to an event enticing travellers to see the host country," she says.

"Although events like the World Cup have an impact, they have yet to reach the same impact in searches as seasonality."

If you have been inspired to visit Brazil in the wake of the World Cup, Alex Burridge of the South America Travel Centre warns that timing is crucial.

Burridge advises against travelling straight away, saying many World Cup visitors will be staying on to explore, making it busy and expensive.

"Stay away from the World Cup ... the best travel experiences are when there are fewer people around," he says.

However, Burridge warns travellers who want to fit in a visit before Rio's 2016 Olympic Games to start planning now.

"You've probably got an 18-month window and anyone who wants to go should get onto it immediately," he says.

Many smaller accommodation properties in Brazil are booked out six to 10 months ahead and there can also be timing issues for flights and permits.

Burridge says last-minute planning for South America can be "difficult", not to mention more expensive.

Do you think the World Cup coverage increased Brazil's attractiveness as a destination? Are you planning to visit? Post your comments below.

FFX Aus