World's strangest flight accessory?

Last updated 14:32 15/05/2014
B-tourist
Designboom.com

PERSONAL SPACE: The 'b-tourist' band is said to provide passengers with a private space during a flight.

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Besides the leg room, free booze and endless snacks, flying first class also provides some much needed privacy that can make a cross-country voyage more enjoyable.

 It's a big part of the reason why flying economy sucks, but a couple of designers may have found a way to make your cramped coach seat feel like first class.

The B-Tourist - created by Idan Noyberg and Gal Bulka - works like a giant elastic strap that tucks behind the headrests on your seat, and the seat in front of you, to provide a little extra privacy while flying in cramped quarters.

Hidden pockets provide an extra spot to store electronics, sunglasses or other items you don't want to cram into the seat pocket in front of you. And the B-Tourist also features a set of cross-connecting straps that allow you to use the giant elastic as a comfortable headrest.

Because it's made from flexible fabric, the B-Tourist is easy to stash in your carry-on bag.

And while it might make it difficult for your seatmates to be served a drink if you've been dealt an aisle seat, you'll never have to see their angry glares while you're in the air.

- Gizmodo

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