‘Old, fat, ugly’ Aeroflot flight attendants lose discrimination case

A group of female flight attendants claims its employer discriminated against them because of their appearance.
REUTERS

A group of female flight attendants claims its employer discriminated against them because of their appearance.

A group of flight attendants has lost its case against a Russian airline after claiming the company discriminated against them because of their age, weight and height. 

The workers, who were employed by Aeroflot, said they were changed from international routes to local ones and given less pay than their younger colleagues. 

The company, however, denied the claims and the case was thrown out of court in Russia this week.

The group of women, not pictured, call themselves STS, a Russian abbreviation for "old, fat, ugly".
REUTERS

The group of women, not pictured, call themselves STS, a Russian abbreviation for "old, fat, ugly".

The group of female flight attendants call themselves STS, a Russian abbreviation for "old, fat, ugly", The Telegraph reported.

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"All stewardesses were photographed, measured and weighed by the airline in June last year, supposedly to have new uniforms ordered," Evgeniya Magurina said, according to the British newspaper. 

"When my boss looked at my photo, he said: 'Zhenya, you know, your cheeks are too big for international flights. And you have big breasts, so you should be wearing a sports bra. This is the way they explained to me the new rules.

"Everyone older than 40 or with clothing size larger than small or medium was taken off international flights."

The airline denied the accusations in a Moscow court this week after publishing a statement earlier this year.

"Aeroflot strictly adheres to the provisions of the Russian legislation, as well as, in accordance with the best international practices, the principles of 'equal opportunities employer'," it said.

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"This implies a categorical rejection of discrimination against workers on the external data, age, race, and gender-based, political and religious views, etc."

At the same time, an airline representative told the Moscow court that every extra kilogram of weight meant an added cost on fuel, the Telegraph reported.

Flight attendant Irina Ierusalimskaya told the BBC she plans to appeal the court's decision and is backed by a top Russian human rights and trade union official, Boris Kravchenko.

Aeroflot is the largest airline of the Russian Federation and a Brand Finance report on Russia said Aeroflot "has the youngest fleet of any major airline", according to the BBC.

 

 - Stuff

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