60-second flights, sand landings and Scottish everything: The hyper-local rebirth of Loganair

Barra airport - aka the beach.

Barra airport - aka the beach.

No need to pack a good book on the flight between two remote Scottish islands - you'll be in the air for 60 seconds. 

Loganair, which runs the world's shortest scheduled flight between Westray and Papa Westray in the Orkney Islands (price: about NZ$30), is a Scottish regional airline that serves the nation's wind-swept highlands and remote islands - and it's about to take a Nessie-sized gamble. 

From September 1, Loganair will ditch its franchise deals with other, larger airlines and fly under its own livery - tartan, of course. The move comes after the airline had a tiff with its English partner Flybe Group over costs and scheduling, and means it'll wave goodbye to the bulk of its £100 million (NZ$178m) in annual revenue. 

A Loganair plane in its spiffy new livery.

A Loganair plane in its spiffy new livery.

Is Loganair worried? Not according to its managing director, Jonathan Hinkles, who told The Independent that the Glasgow-based airline has a loyal customer base that's unlikely to opt for a stiff-upper-lipped rival. 

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Scotland's Highlands and remote archipelagos are on Loganair's service map.

Scotland's Highlands and remote archipelagos are on Loganair's service map.

"We have a strong level of recognition in our core market in the highlands and islands," Hinkles said. "That will carry us through. The task is to establish that affinity where we are not so well known."

It plans to do that by going all-out Caledonian - from its new tag line, "Scotland's airline", to  its plaid planes. 

And Loganair can certainly take travellers off the beaten track. Among its destinations is the Outer Hebridean isle of Barra, where Loganair's de Havilland Canada Twin Otter planes land on a 3.2-kilometre strip of beach, tide permitting. 

Loganair hasn't completely ditched its partnership deals. It also plans to grow its business by extending a code-share partnership with British Airways to at least four routes from the city of Inverness on Scotland's northern coast after BA resumed flying there after 19 years in 2016. 

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No word on whether your in-flight meal options include haggis. 

 - Stuff

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