Near miss between Singapore, Delta planes

Last updated 15:17 07/07/2014

Relevant offers

Travel Troubles

Flight diverted to Rotorua from Hamilton airport may impact Adele fans Student stranded for five days near Grand Canyon made farewell videos for family Emirates Airbus A380 wake turbulence sends private jet into uncontrolled descent Planes were trying to leave and land as the air traffic controller slept the day away Sunwing Airlines pilot found passed out in cockpit pleads guilty to being impaired Plane's propeller found in Australian bushland after falling off mid-flight All 49 passengers, crew survive 'miraculous' crash landing in South Sudan Bird strike forces Virgin Australia flight to turn back to Christchurch Bodyboarder bitten on the bottom by shark Inside the cockpit: Pilot shakes as 737 hit by turbulance

US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) authorities say air traffic controllers at a Houston airport averted a potential midair collision of two planes.

The incident happened on Thursday night 16 kilometres northeast of Bush Intercontinental Airport, when a Singapore Airlines 777 jumbo jet and a Delta Airlines A320 came about a half-mile (800 metres) horizontally and about 200 feet (60 metres) vertically of each other.

Federal guidelines say aircraft should be separated a half-mile (800 metres) vertically and three miles (4.8 kilometres) horizontally.

FAA's Lynn Lunsford told the Houston Chronicle that an air traffic controller noticed the danger and gave pilots instructions.

Lunsford says they have taken steps to ensure flight crews are aware of the guidelines.

In May, the FAA was investigating an incident in which an air traffic controller's mistake put two planes on a collision course.

Ad Feedback

- AAP

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content