Near miss between Singapore, Delta planes

Last updated 15:17 07/07/2014

Relevant offers

Travel Troubles

New Zealand passport robot tells applicant of Asian descent to open eyes Navy sent for as 800 tourists stranded on Havelock Island Stewardess who was eight times over alcohol limit removed from flight Outbreak of tyre-slashing in parking feud around Wellington Airport Qatar-bound flight makes emergency landing off Portuguese coast Toilet chained shut to force freedom campers from Taranaki surf spot Qantas flight from Christchurch to Sydney rerouted due to 'minor fault' Maine ports 'shocked and disappointed' by Princess Cruises' pollution Drunk passenger attacks flight attendant on Turkish Airlines flight Spain: Travellers disgusted by airport mess after cleaners in El Prat airport go on strike

US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) authorities say air traffic controllers at a Houston airport averted a potential midair collision of two planes.

The incident happened on Thursday night 16 kilometres northeast of Bush Intercontinental Airport, when a Singapore Airlines 777 jumbo jet and a Delta Airlines A320 came about a half-mile (800 metres) horizontally and about 200 feet (60 metres) vertically of each other.

Federal guidelines say aircraft should be separated a half-mile (800 metres) vertically and three miles (4.8 kilometres) horizontally.

FAA's Lynn Lunsford told the Houston Chronicle that an air traffic controller noticed the danger and gave pilots instructions.

Lunsford says they have taken steps to ensure flight crews are aware of the guidelines.

In May, the FAA was investigating an incident in which an air traffic controller's mistake put two planes on a collision course.

Ad Feedback

- AAP

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content