Near miss between Singapore, Delta planes

Last updated 15:17 07/07/2014

Relevant offers

Travel Troubles

In the sky above Melbourne, special needs teacher comes to the rescue OE nightmare: Kiwi falls five storeys in effort to retrieve rugby ball from roof The grate escape: 25 things that annoy us about travel Air New Zealand plane on lockdown after passengers fall ill More Kiwi travellers report problems with passport scanning machines Arrests after British family attacked in Thailand Couple plan dream holiday to Las Vegas but book flights from the wrong airport 11-year-old sneaks through airport security and boards Russian flight JetBlue pilot in the US faces jail after allegedly flying drunk American Airlines plane's nose dented after bird strike

US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) authorities say air traffic controllers at a Houston airport averted a potential midair collision of two planes.

The incident happened on Thursday night 16 kilometres northeast of Bush Intercontinental Airport, when a Singapore Airlines 777 jumbo jet and a Delta Airlines A320 came about a half-mile (800 metres) horizontally and about 200 feet (60 metres) vertically of each other.

Federal guidelines say aircraft should be separated a half-mile (800 metres) vertically and three miles (4.8 kilometres) horizontally.

FAA's Lynn Lunsford told the Houston Chronicle that an air traffic controller noticed the danger and gave pilots instructions.

Lunsford says they have taken steps to ensure flight crews are aware of the guidelines.

In May, the FAA was investigating an incident in which an air traffic controller's mistake put two planes on a collision course.

Ad Feedback

- AAP

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content