Malaysia Airlines flight forced to abort take-off

MELANIE KEMBREY
Last updated 13:48 31/07/2014

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Malaysia Airlines flight 176 to Kuala Lumpur was forced to stop mid take-off on a runway at Adelaide Airport on Tuesday. The incident occurred after a Tigerair flight from Melbourne had to change its landing approach. 

Safety investigators say they have no plans to look into the incident.

In a statement, Air Services Australia said reports of a "near miss" were inaccurate and that at no time was the safety of any passengers or aircraft at risk.

Malaysia Airlines would not comment on the incident. Although not at fault, it has brought the carrier's name into headlines again following the twin tragedies of MH17 and MH370 this year. 

The Tigerair pilot requested a "go around" due to an "unstable approach" when arriving at the airport.

"A go-around is a safe and well-practised manoeuvre that sees an aircraft discontinue its approach to the runway when landing," the statement said.

"Additionally, and to ensure the continued safe operations at the airport, air traffic controllers requested an international flight discontinue its take-off."

An Airservices Australia spokeswoman said discontinued take-offs are "standard, safe and well-practised manouevres" that can happen for a range of reasons including weather, wildlife on the runway or a technical issue.

The Aviation Herald reported that the Tigerair flight had been "too high and too fast on approach and went around".

According to reports, it landed safely on its second approach to the runway about 12 minutes later.

It is understood the Malaysia Airlines plane was taxied back to a holding point and its brakes were given time to cool, before it successfully took off less than half an hour later.

An Australian Transport Safety Bureau spokeswoman said there would be no investigation into the incident.

A Tigerair spokeswoman said pilots are are well-trained to perform "go around" procedures and it is a "common and safe" practice.

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- Sydney Morning Herald

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