Jetstar flight under investigation

Last updated 12:40 17/08/2012
Jetstar
Reuters
FLIGHT PROBED: Jetstar is under investigation after a plane flew too low while making its way into Queenstown.

Relevant offers

Travel Troubles

Doctor uses spoon and toothpick to save man suffering from an epileptic fit on Air China flight Several international flights targeted by laser strikes near Auckland Airport Are these hotel door signs sexist? Hotel group Pentahotels under fire for toilet illustrations Plane that Cristiano Ronaldo uses runs off runway in Barcelona Beware of buying batik in Indonesia: How I fell for the most obvious travel scam Indonesia volcano eruption: What travellers need to know International Air Transport Association says air rage incidents reported by airlines on the rise Asiana Airlines flight returns to Los Angeles after smoke reported in cargo area Hundreds of tourists missing after Indonesian volcano Mount Barujari erupts Merlin fined nearly $9 million over rollercoaster crash at Alton Towers

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) is investigating a Jetstar flight which flew lower than it was supposed to part way through its descent into Queenstown.

The incident happened on an Airbus A320 flight from Auckland to Queenstown on July 16.

"During descent, the crew had an incorrect descent profile selected and subsequently descended below the minimum safe altitude," the ATSB said.

Jetstar said the plane's pilots had reported that on approach an incorrect autopilot setting resulted in the aircraft going off its pre-determined track.

"This never put the aircraft in danger and the incident didn't trigger any cockpit alerts. The pilots realised the error and corrected it promptly. Even if the error had not been corrected, the aircraft would still have landed safely," Jetstar said.

The two pilots had a combined total of 23,000 hours experience and have been flying in-and-out of Queenstown for the past two years without incident.

A company spokesman said that for a short time when the plane was supposed to be at 7300 feet (2225 metres) it had dropped down to 6300 feet, and had then gone back up to 7300 feet.

The ATSB expects to have its investigation finished by November.

Ad Feedback

- Stuff

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content