Brakes 'slammed' as take-off aborted

HAMISH BOLAND-RUDDER
Last updated 12:13 23/09/2013

Relevant offers

Travel Troubles

Student stranded for five days near Grand Canyon made farewell videos for family Planes were trying to leave and land as the air traffic controller slept the day away Sunwing Airlines pilot found passed out in cockpit pleads guilty to being impaired Plane's propeller found in Australian bushland after falling off mid-flight All 49 passengers, crew survive 'miraculous' crash landing in South Sudan Bird strike forces Virgin Australia flight to turn back to Christchurch Bodyboarder bitten on the bottom by shark Inside the cockpit: Pilot shakes as 737 hit by turbulance Man arrested smuggling thousands of beetles, spiders, scorpions from Australia Auckland Airport shoots runaway security dog after it delays morning flights

A plane had to reportedly slam on its brakes and abort a take-off as an incoming plane approached due to a "sequencing issue" at Canberra Airport this morning.

According to airport managing director Stephen Byron, the Virgin aircraft had been given the all-clear for take-off by air traffic control.

But the aircraft took longer than usual, and by the time the plane was about to accelerate down the runway there was another plane coming in to land and the clearance had to be cancelled.

"The sequence of events was that the Virgin aircraft took longer to commence its rev-up of engines and roll forward, and by that time it made sense for them to just wait and go behind," Byron told ABC radio.

"I don't think anyone's categorising it as a near-miss or a matter for investigation."

A Twitter user described the experience as "scary" and said the aircraft's brakes were "slammed on", and Byron said the description sounded about right.

"It certainly did have to brake because it was rolling forward once the clearance was cancelled," he said.

Byron said the pilot taxied off the runway, returned to the start point, and was able to then take off "as per normal".

He said whether the event required an investigation was a matter for air traffic control.

Earlier a spokesman for Air Services Australia confirmed the incident, but would not provide any further details.

Ad Feedback

- Canberra Times

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content