Missing tourist survives on flies

AAP WITH KRISTIAN SILVA
Last updated 12:30 07/03/2014
Fairfax Australia

A missing German backpacker has been found after eating flies to survive in the Australian Outback.

Daniel Dudzisz
Supplied
TALE OF SURVIVAL: Missing German backpacker Daniel Dudzisz.

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A German tourist missing for almost three weeks in the Queensland outback has survived the ordeal by eating flies.

Inspector Mark Henderson says Daniel Dudzisz, 26, was picked up by a motorist late Thursday afternoon near Cooper Creek at Windorah, southwest of Longreach.

He went missing on February 17 after attempting to walk between Windorah and Jundah.

Inspector Henderson said Dudzisz became stranded between floodwaters from the Barcoo River for about 10 days.

Dudzisz lived on insects for most of the time, he said.

"He certainly was hungry, but other than that he was in reasonable spirits," he told 612 ABC Brisbane.

"He joked about never going hungry in the Australian outback because of the amount of flies you can eat for their protein apparently.

"He had some baked beans and cereal when he left Windorah and exhausted that pretty quickly, and said he'd been eating flies ever since."

Dudzisz had a couple of meals with Andrew Plax while passing through the remote Queensland town of Yowah earlier in February.

Plax said he wasn't surprised the German had been found. He told Fairfax Media earlier this week that he was confident Mr Dudzisz would be found alive.

"I told you so," he said on Friday morning.

"If it had been another two weeks, then I would have thought he's gone. I'm glad. I had a wry smile when I heard the news."

Plax said he hadn't spoken with Mr Dudzisz yet, but expected him to continue on his lengthy journey on foot despite the unplanned delay.

"I don't think it's going to change him because it's what he wants to do. It's probably not the first time he's been stranded," he said.

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- Brisbane Times

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