Sorry Delta, there are no giraffes in Ghana

MICHAEL KOZIOL
Last updated 08:22 18/06/2014
Delta Giraffe Tweet
Twitter

NICE TRY: Delta Airlines' patriotic tweet backfired when it was pointed out giraffes don't live in Ghana.

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"If you're lucky," Delta Airlines entices travellers on its Ghana destination page, "you might even find yourself in the company of monkeys and rare birds".

But not, in all likelihood, giraffes. Delta learnt that lesson the hard way when it posted a tweet celebrating the US's 2-1 win over Ghana at the World Cup on Monday.

Visually representing the US with the Statue of Liberty is standard fare. But choosing a giraffe to symbolise the west African republic of Ghana raised the eyebrows above more discerning eyes.

The photo selection was problematic because giraffes don't actually live in Ghana.

They are typically found further east, between Chad and South Africa, although some species were known to live in parts of Nigeria. While there is no guarantee that no giraffe has ever entered Ghana, even a travel website promoting the country admits: they don't live there. 

The post set off a flurry of condemnation from people who saw the Delta tweet as an insidious form of racism.

While some Twitter commenters promised to never fly with the airline again, others felt critics were being too sensitive. 

"I hope you realise saying things are racist when they are not is not helpful to those who are actually victims of racism," one user posted.

But for Adelaide-based football writer Andy Cussen, the 'giraffe-gate' demonstrated classic ignorance.

"It's racial stereotyping which is a form of racism. Sorry if people are offended by people being offended," he wrote.

Delta Airlines later deleted and apologised for its "precious tweet", before deleting that apologising instead for its "previous tweet". All things considered: a day its social media manager will try to forget.

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The incident comes only two months after rival airline US Airways caused a storm when it accidentally tweeted a graphic photo of a woman.

- Sydney Morning Herald

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