Norwegians kidnapped in Algeria confirmed dead

Last updated 08:36 26/01/2013

Relevant offers

Africa

Kenyan mall massacre still haunts Ebola survivor Kent Brantly addresses US Congress Gunmen kill 15 at college in Nigeria US military deploys to lead Ebola fight Oscar Pistorius free to compete for South Africa Hundreds feared dead in migrant boat capsize Virus hunter confronts Ebola Liberians Ebola clinics overwhelmed, struggling Did Oscar Pistorius meet his match in Reeva Steenkamp? Oscar Pistorius - convicted killer, but not a murderer

Norwegian energy company Statoil ASA said that three Norwegian employees missing after a terror attack on a gas plant in Algeria have been confirmed dead.

Statoil CEO Helge Lund said the three workers were 58-year-old Tore Bech; Thomas Snekkevik, 35; and 55-year-old Hans M. Bjone.

Bech, who had worked for Statoil in Algeria since 2006, was the stepfather of Norwegian International Development Minister Heikki Holmaas.

Statoil gave no details about the victims or circumstances leading to their discovery or identification.

Two other Norwegian Statoil employees remain missing from the January 16 attack on the Ain Amenas plant in the Sahara, which resulted in a four-day siege by Algerian forces, Statoil said. An al-Qaida affiliated organisation has claimed responsibility for the attack.

Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg conveyed condolences to the families of the dead, describing the attack as "brutal ... and full of evil." He added that it is unlikely that any more survivors of the attack will be found.

Algerian authorities have said at least 37 hostages and 29 militants died during the terrorist attack - which sent scores of foreign energy workers fleeing across the desert for their lives - and that five were still missing. Some of the fatalities were badly burned, making it difficult to identify them.

It was unclear whether the three Norwegians identified were among the missing or whether their bodies had been found but have only now been identified.

Norway has a forensic team in Algeria helping local officials.

Ad Feedback

- AP

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content