Obama's fans less likely to vote

CHRISTOPHER INGRAHAM
Last updated 14:24 11/06/2014
Obama
Reuters
US PRESIDENT: Barack Obama.

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Democrats could be facing a major turnout gap this fall.

Simply put, the more supportive you are of Barack Obama's job performance, the less likely you are to show up at the midterm elections this year. A new survey from the Public Religion Research Institute and The Brookings Institution quantifies the extent of this relationship among various demographic groups and may point to trouble for the Democrats.

Young voters are key players in the Democratic coalition and they generally approve of Obama's job performance, 54 per cent. But they're the demographic group least likely to turn out this November - less than a quarter of 18-29 year-olds say they're "absolutely certain" they'll make it to the polls.

On the other hand, 70 per cent of seniors are certain they'll be voting. Since they're more consistently conservative than any other age group, it's likely that many of them will be voting Republican.

Or, just look at the gap between Democrats and Republicans. Only 51 per cent of Democrats say they're certain to vote this fall, compared to 68 per cent of Republicans.

Across nearly every demographic category - age, race, gender, ideology - groups that lean Republican and tend to disapprove of Obama are significantly more likely to say they'll show up to vote this November. This isn't a new phenomenon - midterm electoral demographics have historically favoured Republicans. Democrats are acutely aware of the issue and are actively working to reshape the 2014 electorate along 2012 lines.

But if these numbers are any indication, Democrats still have their work cut out for them. This year, Republicans are likely to add a few seats to their already comfortable House majority, and may be poised to take control of the Senate as well.

- The Washington Post

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